J.C. Fleming crew 14.10.40

06/08/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets A.73 and A.28.
Night not good for nine Wellington aircraft detailed from this Squadron to carry out individual bombing attacks on above targets. 10/10 cloud experienced as well as heavy ground haze over Germany, making observations difficult.
Total number of bombs carried by aircraft was as follows:- 46 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs fused N.D.T. 11 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs fused ½ – 18hr delay. 8 – 500lbs. G.P. bombs fused N.D.T., and 7 cases of 4lbs. incendiaries.
CB.676 reports, bombs were dropped in one stick from 11,000 feet. Bursts not observed owing to cloud and searchlights. Rear Gunner observed a small fire on leaving the target area.
Bombs dropped on target by CB.677 – targets A.75, bursts unobserved due to haze and searchlights tec.,
CB.678 reports a stick was dropped from 16,000ft. across the docks on the North side of the river at HAMBURG. Nil results observed owing to intense ground activity and cloud layer.
Found impossible to locate either target A.8 or A.9 by CB.679, due to 8/10 cloud at 9,000ft. Aerodrome at STADE attacked, dropping 4-500lbs. bombs. After the attack red hanger lights extinguished, but goose neck flare path remained lit. Dived to 1,000 feet, made two circuits, while front and rear gunners heavily machine gunned flare path and hangers.
Target not located by CB.682. Bombed twin blast furnaces in RUHR. Stick of bombs appeared to straddle target. A fire started near furnaces by incendiaries. CB.683, nil results to report. Returned to base owing to adverse weather conditions.
CB.684 unable to locate target A.75 due to ground haze, so decided to attack one of aerodromes on Dutch coast. Port motor failed while looking for suitable target, so bombs jettisoned in sea. An S.O.S. was sent, but homed by MANSTON, and when within sight of MANSTON Port engine picked up, enabling aircraft to land at base.
Primary target A.75 also not located by CB.685 owing to bad visibility and cloud. Apparent blast furnace 15 miles West of A.75 attacked and also WESEL aerodrome. Which was being used. Results unobserved due to searchlights, but bombs should have dropped on flare path just as an aircraft was landing.
CB.688 reports , bombs dropped in two sticks. Only one bomb observed to burst, which was estimated to drop approximately 4 miles South of Hamm.
Due to ground haze no important observations were obtained. A.A. fire intense and fairly accurate in all target areas and searchlights active. Severe weather conditions over Dutch coast. Navigation by D/R, visual observation and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1A P.9209 AA-B
Raid No. CB.713 A.73

S/L Cyril Eyton ‘Cyrus’ Kay, RAF/ RNZAF 22223/ NZ1011 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Jim Whitlaw Carter, RAFVR 527740 – Observer.
Sgt. Eric Norman Albert, RAFVR 623339 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. James Coventry Heppenstall, RNZAF NZ391382 – Front Gunner.
F/O Alfred Basil Charles, RAF 76005 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:33 – Landed 02:45
Flight Time 05:12

15/08/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Target L.85.
Attacks taken all round were very successful, nine out of ten aircraft detailed from this Unit finding and bombing primary target.
Two level attacks made by CB.774 from 11,000ft. Explosions illuminated aircraft at this height. Incendiaries started several small fires, but quickly extinguished after about 5 minutes.
Three level attacks carried out by CB.775 from 9,000ft West to East. Many hits observed on buildings and incendiaries started many fierce fires. One terrific explosion with vivid white flash and many minor explosions occurred.
CB.776 reports, bombs seen to fall in target area. Large fire started which could be seen for a considerable distance on homeward journey.
CB.777 reports, target successfully attacked. Fires started. One stick at 10,000ft.
Target located and stick dropped across target, by CB.776. Small fires started, smoke plainly visible. Bombs dropped in level stick by CB779 from 10,000ft from South to North. Bursts observed across target AND SEVERAL fires started. Explosions followed, in fires. Nickels dropped N.W. RUHR.
CB.750 reports, one run at 8,700ft, hits believed observed. Second run at 9,000ft, dummy. Third run 8,700ft, hits almost certain. Large columns of white smoke observed over target.
Primary target could not be definitely identified by CB.781, owing to scattered cloud and searchlights. Bombs dropped in stick from 9,000ft on railway junction at LUNEN. Two bombs observed to straddle main crossing and remainder fell along Northern railway line.
No difficulty in locating target by CB.782 and perfect run up made at 11,000ft. Bombs dropped in stick from this height, and hits believed to have been made on target.
Target located and precision bombed by CB.783. Height 12,500ft. Time 23.36hrs. Wireless Operator observed three bomb bursts with white flashes on E of target.
Balloons observed to be flying at 12,000ft over AMSTERDAM, DORTMUND, AND HAMM.
A.A. Fire was heavy and accurate in the RUHR area.
Searchlights very active over the whole area. Enemy aircraft were observed , by about three crews, one seen trailing one of our sorties, in target area, but after a series of bursts by Rear Gunner, made off.
Weather, moderate 4/10 cloud over target, but this cloud did not hinder operations. Visibility was perfect.
Navigation was by D/R, and visual observation mainly, although homing bearings were used in some cases.
“All our aircraft returned safely”.

Wellington Mk.1A P.9206 AA-A
Raid No. CB.777 L.85

S/L Cyril Eyton ‘Cyrus’ Kay, RAF/ RNZAF 22223/ NZ1011 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Jim Whitlaw Carter, RAFVR 527740 – Observer.
Sgt. Eric Norman Albert, RAFVR 623339 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Jack Gibbs, RAFVR 625697 – Front Gunner.
Sgt. James Coventry Heppenstall, RNZAF NZ391382 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:21 – Landed 02:50
Flight Time 05:29

04/09/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Thurenger Forest, Black Forest, and Woods South of Strasburg
Nine Wellington aircraft from this Unit took part in above operations. Seven of the aircraft detailed to carry out attacks on the woods carried 6 containers of incendiary bombs, while CB.931, who attacked wood South of Strasbourg, carried a load of 5 containers of incendiaries (25 lbs), 3 – 250 lbs. incendiaries and one flash bomb. CB.940 carried 6- 250lbs. bombs fused N.D.T.
CB.992 made a level attack from a height of 11,000 feet, the bombs being dropped in a stick every 12 seconds. Terrific fires started in a line covering eight miles and could be seen 20 minutes after setting course for home.
CB.923 searched the target area and dropped bombs in a NW. SE direction covering an area of 5 or 6 miles. Over 100 small fires were started and the glow could be seen over 20 miles away on returning.
CB.926 dropped bombs in groups of four at eleven second intervals in a Northerly direction, from Swiss border on Western side of target area. The incendiaries were seen to be burning amongst the trees, but no time spent waiting to see further results.
CB.927 bombed central portion of target area L (Black Forest). Numerous small fires observed but no large conflagration seen at time of leaving area.
CB.928 reports that bombs were dropped in long circular stick and observed to burst. Some fires started but aircraft left area before extent of fire could be estimated.
CB.929 reports that bombs were dropped on targets and fires started.
CB.930 spread bombs in a stick running N.N.E. across Northern corner. Several small fires started. Half container was dropped from 6000 feet on LUNEVILLE aerodrome, and fires were started which could be seen for 40 miles.
CB. 931 reports that all incendiaries were dropped in a circular area, radius about 3 miles. The fires burnt for 10-15 minutes but did not persist. A photograph was taken 20 minutes after the first attack and shows that the fires were not catching.
CB.940 reports that two bombs fell on hangers and four on tarmac of aerodrome.
Extensive road traffic movements observed in North West France. Dummy aerodrome at LE TOUQUET – CB.928 reports, 2 lights flashing “S” alternatively and ‘M” together, situated 6 miles South East of OSTEND.
CB.922 and 940 report light and heavy flak, but taken all round, very little encountered.
Searchlights encountered over HAMM and Belgian Coast, but here again, on the whole very few.
Weather good throughout operations, mist patches in places, but visibility generally very good.
Navigation by D/R mainly, assisted by Astro in two instances.
System of locating beacons for balloons reported to be excellent by CB.931

Wellington Mk.1c L.2550 AA-?
Raid No. CB.931 Strasburg

F/O Trevor Owen Freeman, RNZAF NZ1026 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Hawkesley, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. Eric Norman Albert, RAFVR 623339 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Gibb, RAFVR – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 20:40 – Landed 03:40
Flight Time 07:00

12/09/1940 – Bombing Attack on Emden and Schwerte
Nine Wellington aircraft from this Unit took part in Operations against the above targets. A mixed bomb load was carried and consisted of 250lbs. bombs, fused N.D.T., 250lbs. bombs delayed action, and containers of incendiaries, while CB.984 carried one flash bomb.
CB.984 and CB.985 failed to locate the target due to 10/10 cloud, and bombs were brought back.
CB.986 reports that bombs were dropped, but bursts were unobserved due to bad visibility.
CB.987 bombed target in bad visibility from 6000 feet, but results were unobserved owing to cloud.
CB.988 failed to locate target owing to 10/10 cloud. Intense A.A. fire was experienced and bombs were released over centre of A.A. activity.
CB.994 reports that results were not observed.
Owing to dense low cloud, CB.995 failed to locate original target, SCHWERTE. Bombs were dropped from 1000 feet on the aerodrome at DE KOOY, but results were not observed.
CB/997 failed to locate target, but bombs were released on A.A. emplacements between SOEST and DORTMUND.
CB.999 reports that direct hits were scored on ammunition store in dock buildings. Heavy explosions occurred and large fires were started.
Owing to bad visibility no observations or reconnaissance were made although CB.999 reports that docks and wharves were clearly seen.
Light and heavy A.A. fire was experienced in many parts of the target areas, while flak ships or warships continued barrage some distance to sea. Flaming onions were also experienced at one point.
Searchlights were numerous and very active, but owing to cloud were ineffective.
No enemy aircraft were encountered.
ten-tenths cloud was experienced over most of the route. Icing conditions, rain and electrical storms were also experienced.
Navigation was carried out by D/R, W/T and homing bearings.
CB.999 returned to base with shell holes in wings and machine gun bullet through front turret. Attack was carried out from 150 feet – machine blown up to 600 and was very unstable on return journey. S.O.S. was sent out as machine was expected to land in sea. P/O Denton, captain of this machine, was awarded D.F.C. (Immediate).

Wellington Mk.1c L.7797 AA-F

Raid No. CB.986 D.184
P/O Gordie Keith Larney, RAF 33582 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Richard Booth Elliott, RAFVR 581379 – Observer.
Sgt. Robert ‘Bob’ Sheppard, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. McLaughlan, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. William Ainslie Reid, RAFVR – Rear Gunner .

Take Off not listed – Landed not listed
Flight Time not listed

14/09/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Antwerp and Soest
Ten Wellington Aircraft of this Unit were detailed to carry out above operations. Bomb load consisted of 250lbs. bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. delayed action bombs, containers of incendiaries and CB.120 carried one flash bomb.
CB.115 reports that owing to severe ice forming cloud, target was not reached, but an attack was made from 7000 feet on DE KOOY Aerodrome, where a stick of bombs was dropped on hangars. Numerous fires started, and major and minor explosions followed, suggesting blowing up of ammunition. Fires lit up aerodrome buildings.
Owing to 10/10 cloud Cb.116 failed to locate original target. Bombs were dropped on rail junction at AARHUS.
CB.117 reports three large explosions took place after the first stick of 8 – 250lbs. bombs had been dropped on East Docks. Second stick of 7 – 250 lbs bombs and one S.B.C. seen to explode on new docks.
CB.118 reports that target was located and bombs dropped, but owing to thick haze results could not be estimated.
CB.119 reports that one stick of bombs and one S.B.C. were dropped on dock basins and fires were started by incendiaries on quay. Yellow explosions from two of the fires at irregular intervals.
CB.120 reports that all bombs were seen to burst in docks, but no big fires were seen.
CB.122 reports that owing to an error in map reading, one stick of bombs was dropped over target area and hits are believed to have been scored although no fires were observed.
CB.123 reports that barges in chain basin were hit. Direct hits were scored on dicks and barges in basin North of town. A large fire was also started in this basin.
CB126 reports that bombs were dropped and bursts observed in main dock area. At time of leaving target incendiaries were observed burning fiercely with orange coloured flames. Repeated minor explosions were observed in vicinity of incendiaries.
P/O. Denton reports that one stick of nine bombs was dropped on N.W. docks, but owing to evasive action, only first two bombs observed to burst. One stick was dropped on South docks nearest town, and all bombs were observed to make direct hits.
Recognition signal – red and two white star cartridge, observed several times near target area. Flare paths observed at aerodromes near WOENSDRECHTE, and South of ANTWERP. Dummy flarepath seen N.E. of ANTWERP. Flashing beacon 12 miles E.N.E. ANTWERP. Three pairs of ships about 1000 tonnes were observed on ZUYDER ZEE, while two large merchant ships were seen N.W. side of main basin, and one 4000 ton merchant ship seen sailing N.W.-S.E. of FLUSHING out into North Sea.
Fairly intense light and heavy A.A. fire experienced in many parts of target area. This was not very accurate.
Searchlights were few and inactive.
Only one enemy aircraft, an ME.109, was observed over target area.
Icing conditions and electrical storms were experienced by most aircraft. Weather in target area was good..
Navigation was mainly D/R, with W/T, MF/DF. Astro and homing bearings.
CB,123 reports an excellent trip, exceptional bombing done by Observer, also excellent Astro navigation. Approximately 50 small boats, believed fishing smacks seen on beach between HAGUE and the Hook near SCHEVENINGEN.

Wellington Mk.1c L.7797 AA-F
Raid No. CB.116

P/O Gordie Keith Larney, RAF 33582 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Richard Booth Elliott, RAFVR 581379 – Observer.
Sgt. Robert ‘Bob’ Sheppard, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. McLaughlan, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. William Ainslie Reid, RAFVR – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:00 – Landed 00:45
Flight Time 02:45

20/09/1940 – Bombing Attacks Against Enemy Territory
Nine Wellington aircraft were detailed to carry out the above operations. The bomb load was made up of 250lbs. bombs and containers of 4lbs. incendiaries.
CB.157 reports that a large fire was started in docks standing alongside No. 1 basin (with lockgate) and seen to burn for 50 minutes, and grow to size of a hangar. Lockgates were hit with a stick of 10 – 250lbs. bombs.
CB.158 reports that all bombs were dropped in one stick bursting down dock area between the two basins. One large fire started. Still burning 20 minutes later.
CB.159 reports that one stick laid across docks observed to make direct hits. Fires and explosions followed which could be seen on second climb. One stick five N.D.T. and one S.B.C. laid longitudinal across 15/20,000 tone vessel. First bomb 40-50yds astern, remainder either direct hits or very near misses.
CB.160 reports that bombs were dropped in one stick across harbour entrance. Large fires observed on N.E. side of harbour mouth started by incendiaries.
CB.162 reports eight bombs burst in target area though no fires started. A large fire was started in the deck area but was apparently caused by a machine bombing at exactly the same time.
CB.164 dropped one stick of six 250lbs bombs on N.W. heading which was seen to burst in vicinity of tidal basin. One stick of five 250lbs bombs and one S.B.C. dropped on S.E. heading was seen to burst on jetty of fish harbour. Incendiary fires observed to seaward side of fort on north side of harbour entrance.
CB.165 dropped first stick in Nos. 1 and 2 basins heading 180° approximately. A second stick and one S.B.C. was dropped in No.3 Basin heading 045° approximately.
One stick and S.B.C was dropped by CB.163 on Eastern side of outer harbour wharves. Bombs exploded, but no fires observed.
Several large fires were seen and were visible for miles after leaving target area. CB.157 reports that a plane was shot down north of the docks at 22.35 hours. Barge concentration seen on OSTEND-BRUGES CANAL. Submarine or “E” boat observed by CB159 signalling in morse short distances from Belgium coast. This aircraft also encountered flak barrage in mid-channel. Parachute flare dropped and two searchlights and light flak, presumably from British convoy, observed by CB160.
Fairly heavy and accurate A.A. fire encountered in all areas.
Searchlights were fairly active, although not particularly accurate.
One ME.110 was encountered by CB.157 off target coast, but owing to the speed of the former, no contact was made. Two unidentified aircraft were encountered over target area by CB.159 but no attack made.
Weather was good in target areas, although patches of cloud were encountered over North Sea.
Navigation was by D/R, visual fixes, map reading and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3171 AA-E
Raid No. CB.159

P/O Frank Henderson Denton, RAF 36238 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Andy’ Orrock, RAF – Navigator.
Sgt. James ‘Jimmy’ Farquhar, RAF – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Leonard A. Hayter, 649376 – Front Gunner.
P/O Edward Arthur Jelley, RAF 78762 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:20 – Landed 00:25
Flight Time 03:05

23/09/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets at Berlin, Le Havre and Hamburg
Ten Wellington aircraft of this Unit were detailed to carry out attacks against the targets above. A mixed bomb load was carried and was made up of 250lbs bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs bombs, delayed action, and containers of incendiaries.
CB.167 reports four fires started on dock area. Minor explosions were seen on leaving.
One stick and S.B.C. was dropped by CB.163 on Eastern side of outer harbour wharves. Bobs exploded, but no fires observed.
Several large fires were seen and were visible for miles after leaving target area.
CB.157 reports that a plane was shot down north of the docks at 22.35 hours. Barge concentration seen on OSTEND-BRUGES CANAL. Submarine or “E” boat observed by CB.159 signalling in morse short distance from Belgian coast. This aircraft also encountered flak barrage in mod-channel. Parachute flare dropped, and two searchlights and light flak, presumably from British convoy, observed by CB.160.
Fairly heavy and accurate A.A. fire encountered in all areas.
Searchlights were fairly active, although not particularly accurate.
One ME.110 was encountered by CB.157 off target coast, but owing to the speed of the former, no contact was made.
Two unidentified aircraft were encountered over target area by CB.159 but no attack was made.
Weather was good in target areas, although patches of cloud were encountered over the North Sea.
Navigation was by D/R, visual fixes, map reading and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3166 AA-M
Raid No. CB.175 Berlin

F/L Frederick John ‘Popeye’ Lucas, RNZAF NZ1056 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
P/O Donald Mackay, RAFVR 532942/ 44564 – Observer.
Sgt. Eric Norman Albert, RAFVR 623339 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Stuart, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
F/O Alfred Basil Charles, RAF 76005 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 00:00 – Landed 00:00
Flight Time 00:00

02/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets M.116 and A.69
Ten Wellington aircraft carried out the above attacks. A mixed bomb load was carried and was made up of 500lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs delayed action, containers of 4;bs. Incendiaries, while CB.236 carried one flash bomb.
CB.226 failed to locate target and bombs were brought back as no military target could be located.
CB.227 reports that bombs were dropped in a single stick across ZWISCHEICHEUR AERODROME. Small fires started by incendiaries.
Results were not observed by CB.232 owing to nine tenths cloud.
CB.234 reports that target was not attacked owing to 10/10 cloud extending over route half way over North Sea to target area.
Owing to very low cloud, no definite results were seen by CB.235. Large flashes were seen reflected on clouds which kept going for about 20 mins.
No results were observed by CB.236.
CB.237 reports that bombs were observed to burst short of target by 400 yards.
CB.238 reports that a stick of bombs were dropped on DE KOOY AERODROME. First bombs seen to burst short, but remainder on aerodrome.
CB.239 dropped one stick of bombs on red obstruction lights at Aerodrome at WESSEL. Results not observed owing to cloud, but there was a glow against the clouds resembling a fire.
Bomb bursts were observed by CB.240
Large fire seen in vicinity of AMSTERDAM. Flak ships observed off Dutch coast for 20 miles.
Heavy and light A.A. fire, fairly accurate, experienced in all target areas.
Slight searchlight activity but ineffective owing to cloud.
No enemy aircraft were seen.
Weather was very poor; heavy cloud over whole of journey.
Navigation was mainly D/R, with Astro in one instance.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2550 AA-L
Raid No. CB.232 A.69

S/L Francis George Levett Bain, RAF 28259 – Pilot.
P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. J. Brown, RAF – Observer.
Sgt. Goodwin, RAF – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Mason, RAF – Front Gunner.
Sgt. N. McKinna, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:30 – Landed 01:00
Flight Time 03:30

14/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets A.76 and CC.24.
Eight Wellington aircraft of were detailed to carry out attacks on the above targets. The bomb load, which was a mixed one, consisted of 500lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs, delayed action, containers of4lbs. incendiaries, and tins of Deckers.
CB.303 reports bombs burst along length of target from South to North starting three fires burning with orange-red flame. Fires suddenly spread with great rapidity and a tremendous explosion followed immediately. Showers of sparks were thrown high into the air; orange fire raging as target was left.
CB.304 dropped one stick across railway line at HANOVER. Large white explosions seen leaving target.
CB.306 dropped bombs in one stick on North side of No.1 basin. Large fire started.
CB.307 failed to locate primary target, and secondary targets, although located target areas. Attack carried out from 14,000 feet on LINGEN railway station. Incendiary fires larger than usual; bomb explosions observed on railway.
CB.308 reports all bombs seen to burst on target. Two explosions followed 30 seconds after bomb bursts and one terrific explosion one and a half mins. afterwards. Two large fires with columns of white smoke 5000-6000 feet in height and two smaller fires from incendiaries. Six tins of deckers scattered over target area, and eight tins dropped over RUHR area.
CB.309 reports bombs dropped in one stick. Bursts observed and incendiaries seen to start a line of fires which grew rapidly then died down but again broke out with about six explosions. A heavy smoke cloud was seen over the fires.
CB.312 reports that bomb bursts were observed in target area from stick of eight between Nos. 2 and 3 basins, starting at entrance (dock gates) of No.3 and finishing about centre of No.3 basin.
CB.316 reports incendiary bombs seen bursting near fire previously started between Nos. 2 and 3 basins. Basins presumably hit by high explosive bombs. All bombs dropped in one stick.
Dummy flare path seen at SOESTERBERG in Holland. Suspected dummy marshalling yard observed 30* HAMM 12 miles.
Very little A.A. fire experienced.
Searchlights were numerous but no very accurate. No enemy aircraft were seen
Heavy cloud was experienced to English Coast on journey out. Clear from then on.
Navigation was by D/R, Q.D.M’s, and Astro.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2550 AA-L
Raid No. CB.306 CC.24

P/O James Cecil Fleming, RAF 44402 – Pilot.
P/O W.R. Faulkner, RAF – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Jim Whitlaw Carter, RAFVR 527740 – Observer.
Sgt. Eric Norman Albert, RAFVR 623339 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Stewart, RAFVR? – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Ronald Edward Ashby Peckham, RNZAF NZ40714 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 20:00 – Landed 02:00
Flight Time 06:00