I.R. Gow crew 25.07.40

06/04/1940 – Reconnaissance and Nickel over Minden
As Captain of aircraft P.9210. I was detailed to carry out a reconnaissance and Nickel Operation on the night of 6/7th. April. 1940 as detailed in No.3 Group Form B.102 dated 25.3.40.

I was airborne FELTWELL at 19.15 hours and set course for turning point 54° 06′ N. 06° 00′ E, at 19.20 hours. A climbing speed of 110 m.p.h. was maintained until a height of 10,000 feet was attained, at which time we could see the TERSCHELLING light. The airspeed was increased to 140 m.p.h. and 10,000 feet was maintained throughout the greater part of the reconnaissance. A turn in for the German coast was made on a D/R E.T.A. Searchlights were very active and accurate and evasive action was taken practically on the whole leg to Minden, which was the target area. Nickel dropping commenced 25 minutes before our E.T.A. for MINDEN, which was completed just as the town of MINDEN came into view. The reconnaissance was successfully carried out over Minden at 13,000 feet and during which time searchlights were very active and frequent A.A. flaks were seen from the ground. Shortly after setting course for Base the W/T failed, and so the homeward navigation was done entirely on D/R, a landing being made at BIRCHAM NEWTON at 03.20 hours.

I took off from BIRCHAM NEWTON at 04.00 hours, landing back at Base at 04.20 hours.

Wellington Mk.1A P.9230? AA-?
Raid No. PCB.149 River Wesser. Petershagen to Minden.

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC Edwards, RAF – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Front Gunner.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 19:15 – Landed 03:20
Flight Time 08:05

21/04/1940 – AALBORG AERODROME
I took off as Captain in Wellington aircraft P.9212 “F” from FELTWELL at 1831 hrs, and arrived over DENMARK at position 56* 32′ N. 08* 08’E, at 21.28 hts in moonlight. The countryside was clearly visible at 6,200 ft, but the black-out was good. The fjords were excellent landmarks, and the target was located by following the fjords running EAST to WEST, and the aerodrome was pin pointed by the island S.W. of the target. A white flashing light (1 sec) every five seconds was sighted on the Danish Coast at position 56° 04′ N. 08° 08′ E.

Aircraft was unmolested by searchlights, until within 10 miles of the target. A run over the target was made at 6,200 ft, from S.W. to N.E. and bombs were dropped. During the run all searchlights positioned in a complete circle about the aerodrome, radius of five miles. Several were also observed on the South bank of the Hjord and to the West. After the searchlights had established our position during the run over the target, intense and accurate flak fire was experienced throughout concentrated over the centre of the aerodrome.

Intermittent star-shells were seen. Before the run had been completed, heavy and accurate A.A. batteries opened fire and persistent bursts were seen on the aircraft level to the rear and sides about 70 or 80 yards away. Slight grazes afterwards found on the aircraft. Under the circumstances only one run over the target was considered advisable. Incendiaries and G.P. 40lb. bombs were dropped together, and the two 250 tail fused bombs were dropped by ‘stick’ method. Bursts at the time were difficult to observe, due to the intensity of searchlights before turning after the run, three fires were seen burning on the South edge of the aerodrome and one in the centre. One 250 was seen to burst on the North side of the target near the road.

When clear of the target area, aircraft was dived to 4,000 feet approximately and all guns were trained on searchlights and A.A. flashes. One searchlight was observed to be extinguished.. No activity apparent on roads, nor was any movements of shipping or traffic seen in the fjords. During the return journey to Base, no shipping was observed in vicinity of Danish coast. During run over the target, one enemy single engined aircraft without lights was observed silhouetted 400ft below travelling at high speed on our reciprocal course.

Indicated airspeed on return was 165-170 m.p.h. and landfall was made on the English Coast at Ipswich. Navigation was carried out by D.R. with continued use of loop bearings from Hilversum and Radio Paris, the latter proved strong, but unreliable. An approximate return trip (above cloud) was established by means of three loop bearings from Hilversum.

Astro fixes were used where possible in conjunction with loop and W/T bearings. Homing bearings were used from coast to Base.
Flying time:- 6hrs. 30mins.

Petrol Consumption:= 582 galls. 89.6 galls per hr.
Oil Consumption Port. 2 1/2 galls. = 3.1 pints per hour
”           ”         Star. 4         ”     = 5 pints per hr.

Wellington Mk.1A P.9212 AA-C/F?
Raid No. TCB.172

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC William Eric Nevill, RAF 631165 – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Front Gunner.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 18:35 – Landed 01:05
Flight Time 06:30

07/05/1940 – Bombing raid on Stavanger Aerodrome
Three aircraft took off with the intention of bombing STAVANGER aerodrome at 19.05 hours and set course at 19.14 hours. Coast was crossed at 19.30 hrs. and due to cloud the North Sea was crossed at approx. 3500ft. At 20.26 hrs on the outward journey a submarine was sighted at position BFWY5530, but owing to orders was allowed to proceed unmolested. Low cloud was encountered about 100 miles off the Norwegian coast appeared to be 10/10, height of top estimate at 500ft, extended over a wide area. The target area was completely covered in cloud but after continuing on a course of 30°(M) for some time tops of mountains were seen to the starboard. A wide sweep was made bringing the formation around onto a Westerly course. Searchlights swept the sky at D.R. position of STAVANGER on a course of 222°(M). Course was set for Base at 22.35 hrs and due to bad visibility, formation split up 200 miles out from English coast on return. Navigation was by D.R. assisted by MF fixes. Bombs were jettisoned “live” at approx.: 150 miles out on the return journey. ALL aircraft had landed at Base at 0200 hrs.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC William Eric Nevill, RAF 631165 – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Front Gunner.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 19:10 – Landed 01:45
Flight Time 06:35

12/05/1940 – Bombing attacks on Target A.J.8. (Krefold-Verdingen)
The three Wellingtons Aircraft carried out individual attacks on A.J.8c(KREFELD-VERDINGEN) in accordance with instructions contained in Form “B” 133 of 12/5/40. Each aircraft carried 12 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs, 50% fused N.D.T. and 50% fused 3,6,8 and 12 hour delay in equal proportions, that is over the three aircraft.

TCB.192 reported that target was located by light on KREFELD Aerodrome and glimpse of bend in river RHINE. A stick of 9 bombs dropped from 10,000ft. at 22.55hrs, but 3 bombs held up owing to trouble with electrical circuit. Not possible to see bursts of bombs, as evasive action was taken owing to intense searchlights activity. TCB.193 easily located target at 23.04 hrs. and at 23.10 hrs all 12 bombs were released in a stick from 11,000 feet. Results of bursts not observed, but fires started by previous attacks. Four bombs dropped in a stick from 10,000ft at 23.06 hrs by TCB.194 after locating target at 23.05hrs, these noticed to burst each side of existing fires. A further 4 bomb dropped on line of transport moving Southwest from target, seen to burst at head of column. Remaining bombs dropped column moving West along road running West from target, burst noticed between first and second vehicles. The forth bomb held up and had to be jettisoned over target area. Numerous fires noticed on both sides of RHINE and in HOLLAND Parachute flares seen in ANTWERP at 00.15hrs followed by what appeared to be four Red incendiary bombs dropped in centre of town in form of stick and followed few minutes later by stick of four presumed green incendiary bombs. A.A. fire quite active but not accurate over target and RUHR areas, inaccurate light flak also seen and searchlights very active over these two areas. Only one enemy aircraft seen near ANTWERP, but identity could not be established. Weather good and clear, considerable light given by moon. Navigation by D.R. and Map reading on outward flights and D.R. and D/F fixes on return.

All aircraft had landed safely at Base by 02.00hrs.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC William Eric Nevill, RAF 631165 – Wireless Operator.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:10 – Landed 02:00
Flight Time 04:50

15/05/1940 – Bombing Attack on Target A.79 (Holten Sterkrade) and Target A.H.18 (Bridges at Turnhout)
Three aircraft attempted to attack target A.79 and three A.H.18, all attacks being made independently.

Aircraft on target A.79 carried 12 – 250lbs. G.P. fused 50% N.D.T. and 50% 6,8 and 12 hour delay.

Aircraft on target A.H.18 carried 12 – 250lbs G.P. 50% N.D.T and 50% 3,6,8 and 12 hours delay.

Only TCB.210 able to find target owing to exceptionally poor visibility. Stick of 12 bombs dropped by TCB.210 on by TCB.210 on bridge over canal at TURNHOUT, height 4,000 feet, bursts observed from canal at about 100 yards to North.

Four aircraft returned with bombs, but the fifth jettisoned load in Sea.
Many fires observed in all areas. A.A. fire slight in target area, but heavy over HOLLAND. Searchlights numerous in target area and generally all over enemy territory. No enemy aircraft seen. Weather very hazy over all areas with 9/10’s Cumulo-Nimbus from Easter HOLLAND to RUHR area.
Thunder and lightening interfered with W/T.

Navigation by D.R. and W/T bearings. All aircraft returned safely, but operations a failure owing to weather conditions.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC William Eric Nevill, RAF 631165 – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:40 – Landed 01:15
Flight Time 03:35

17/05/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets, A.64, A.75, A.79, M.435, M.464, M.458, AC.6 and AC.7
Attacks were made independently each aircraft 12 – 250lbs. bombs the fusing for each aircraft’s bomb load being 3 N.D.T., 6 D.A. and 31/2hr delay.
Target AC.6 bombed with 2 sticks of 3 bombs and direct hits seen to strike centre of base of bridge. On target AC.7 stick of 6 dropped across road and rail bridges on river MAAS. TCB.214 reported that target A.75 successfully attacked and also convoy at VALHENSWAARD, 6 direct hits being observed. TCB.215 bombed Blast Furnaces of target in RUHR, but results not known, due to intense searchlight activity, afterwards attacked a mechanized unit from 1,500 feet and direct hits observed. Both TCB.216 and 217 failed to locate targets and returned to Base with bomb load. Bombs dropped on target A.64 by TCB.218 only after difficulty due to low cloud.

Black-out over whole area good, but all targets hard to locate due to slight ground haze.

Illuminated drome 8 miles West of WESEL, thought to be a dummy. A.A. fire active and light flak intense and accurate, All aircraft held in searchlights beams in all areas, harder to escape than usual, no enemy aircraft observed.
Aircraft landed at other dromes due to fog at Base.

Navigation by D/R and Map Reading on outward flights and by D/R and D/F fixes and homing bearings on return.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC Walter Stanley Kitson, RAF 580055 – Wireless Operator.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:15 – Landed 02:35
Flight Time 04:20

19/05/1940 – Bombing Operations over Enemy Territory
All aircraft carried out individual attacks and carried 6. 250 lbs. G.P. and 6 containers of 4lbs. incendiary bombs each.
On run up to target KCB.235 received heavy burst of machine-gun fire, result that 2nd Pilot struck by bullet in right shoulder and main bonded cable for bomb release equipment shot away. KCB.238? attacked road targets at HAYBES, starting many fires. Afterwards convoy of 10 trucks attacked in nearby road, hits observed. One incendiary container and one 250lbs. bomb failed to release. Targets FUMAY and TUBIZE successfully attacked by KCB.237, hits being observed on both. Rail junction 3 miles South of MEZIERES bombed with three 250lbs. bombs two direct hits observed, a further three bombs dropped on railway north of DEVILLE bursting at side of the line. Incendiary bombs then dropped on wood one mile East of MONTHERNE and fires started.

KCB.239 attacked large mechanised column at FUMAY with 3 250lbs. bombs and rear gunner sprayed with machine-gun fire, hits observed. Target “B” at FUMAY attacked with 6 containers of incendiaries, and road and rail bridge at NIVELLES bombed. KCB.240 bombed woods 5 miles West of VOUZIERS and convoy of transport waggons, many seen to catch fire. KCB.241 reports dropping incendiaries in woods ½ mile South of HAYBES and attacked bridge, hits observed on road alongside.

Many fires seen, visibility excellent. A.A. fire extremely heavy and accurate in target area and fur machines sustained hits, one having a 3” shell pass right through the PORT aileron, without exploding and searchlights active and accurate.

A few enemy aircraft seen on flight. Navigation by D.R. and Map Reading on way out and D.R. and homing bearings on return journey.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K
Target: Haybes

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC Walter Stanley Kitson, RAF 580055 – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:45 – Landed 02:20
Flight Time 04:35

21/05/1940 – Bombing Operations over Enemy Territory (Aachen and Dinant)
Eight aircraft detailed to carry out individual bombing attacks on above targets, six on target AACHEN and two on target DINANT.
All aircraft carried 12 – 250lbs. G.P. fused N.D.T. bombs each.
KCB.248 dropped 12 bombs on Marshalling yards and scored direct hits, and also KCB.249.

KCB. 252 failed to locate target and returned to base with bomb load.

KCB.253, KCB.256, KCB257 successfully attacked target, but unable to observe results due to intense searchlight activity. KCB.256 proceeded and attacked Power Station on S.E. of MAASTRICHT dropping three sticks of two bombs each. Two hits seen on railway siding beside station.

KCB.267 attacked road and rail bridge at DINANT, all strikes very near.

KCB.266 also on target failed to return.

Wellington Mk.1A L.7784 AA-D

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC William Eric Nevill, RAF 631165 – Wireless Operator.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:40 – Landed 02:15
Flight Time 04:35

23/05/1940 – Bombing Operations over Enemy Territory
Six Wellington aircraft detailed to carry out individual bombing attacks, but just prior to taking off one machine (KCB.274 F/O Williams) developed engine trouble and did not go.

12 – 250 lbs. G.P. bombs were carried by each aircraft. KCB.272 attacked target in two shallow dives dropping a stick of 6 bombs on each run. Results not definitely known due to searchlights, but bursts seen near bridge, which was object of attack. KCB.275 reports that on his E.T.A over target came down through clouds and found himself to be in ring of 12 searchlights with a small amount of light flak coming up. . Two sticks of 3 bombs each dropped on centre of flash and three sticks of two bombs each dropped on different groups, which went out and stayed out.

A stick of 12 bombs were dropped along direction of BRUSSELS – GEMBLOUX railway line by KCB. 279, results not known again due to searchlights. Results not observed by KCB,280 who attacked target on cross roads by diving and releasing a stick of 12 bombs.

KCB.281 did not locate target, but located a convoy of approximately 50 vehicles in road between WAVRE and GEMBLOUX on which he dropped a stick of six bombs. Second stick of six dropped on row of searchlights bordering NAMUR. Two direct hits estimated.

On the whole observations of ground activity were very obscured due to large amount of cloud extending over whole of target area. Black-out over whole area exceptionally good. All aircraft experienced both light and heavy flak, especially accurate light flak from NAMUR.

Searchlights very active and accurate, seen to be operating in groups of up to 12 in most areas. No enemy aircraft observed. The weather was not good, very heavy cumulus clouds extending from 5,000 to 14,000 feet with ice accretion being experienced over 8,000ft. Clouds too thick to gain advantage from moon. Navigation by D/R. on way out and by D/R and homing bearings on return journey.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC William Eric Nevill, RAF 631165 – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:30 – Landed 01:40
Flight Time 04:10

28/05/1940 – Bombing Operations over Enemy Territory Roulers and Menin)
Seven aircraft detailed to carry out individual bombing attacks on above targets. Only two able to definitely locate target, which they bombed (due to bad visibility)
A mixed bomb load was ordered NCB.307 and 314 carried 11 – 250lbs. G.P. and one case of incendiary each. NCB.308, 309 and 317, 12 – 250lbs. while NCB.315 and 516 carried 6 – 500lbs. G.P.’s.

NCB.308 reports that he attacked target by dive bombing from 2,500 feet in two successive dives and dropped bombs in stick of six each time. Direct hits seen on centre of target, and many lights seen to extinguish.

NCB.516 reports that he located target from 5,000 feet and carried out precision bombing as follows:- One bomb 5,000 feet, two bombs from 5,500 feet and three bombs from 4,000 feet, results not observed owing to pall of smoke over whole area.

Night poor for observations, only thing of importance reported was large fires around all main centres.

Very little A.A. Fire encountered by any aircraft, and such as was being inaccurate.

Searchlights quite active over whole of area but no trouble experienced in evading area.
No enemy aircraft were observed.
Weather not good, heavy rain squalls experienced throughout whole journey. Over the target area the cloud base was broken at 1,000 feet and high clouds extended up to 12,000 feet. Thunderstorms very prevalent. Heavy ground mist experienced on return to Base and 5 aircraft ordered to land at MILDENHALL.
Navigation by D/R and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3165 dnc AA-L

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC Green, RAF – Wireless Operator.
AC John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 23:05 – Landed 02:00
Flight Time 02:55

31/05/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Target G.1 Nieuport
Nine aircraft detailed to carry out individual attacks on target, but one failed to locate same and returned to BASE with bombs.
Seven aircraft carried 7 – 500lbs. G.P. bombs while remaining two carried 14 – 250 lbs G.P. bombs each. PCB.320 reports that he dropped bombs in three sticks of 4,5,6 bombs each, first caused violent explosions and large fires in target area. Second and third seen to burst near first, no accurate observation made. PCB.321 reports that lights observed on road S.E. of NIEUPORT and stick of 7 – 500lbs. G.P. bombs dropped. Large fire started, numerous red and white flashes commenced after burst. All lights went out.

PCB.324 failed to locate target at NIEUPORT but attacked dock area at OSTEND with stick of 14 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs. Many direct hits registered on docks.

PCB326 first dropped single bomb from 4,500 ft. and direct hit on town observed, two sticks three bombs then next dropped at different times one burst starting a large fire.

PCB.327 failed to locate target and returned to base with bomb load.

PCB.329 attacked target by level bombing from 3,000ft. Three bursts observed in town, and one bomb on second run a direct hit on road which joins OSTEND – NIEUPORT.

PCB.330 dropped stick of 7 – 500lbs. G.P. bombs and hits observed on main road junction on East side of town.

PCB.332 reports that owing to smoke over target area, impossible to see results of dropping 7 – 500lbs. G.P’s in stick from 3,500ft.

Due to bad visibility over the target area, PCB.335 bombed enemy activity searchlights and A.A. Battery two miles South of POPERINGHE.
Night was poor for observations due to low cloud and smoke pall, but many lights seen along beach, artillery in region of GRAVELINES and many large fires round DUNKIRK.

Very little A.A. Fire experienced, searchlights around OSTEND, and one in target area active. Some put out of action by machine-gun fire. No enemy aircraft seen Weather not the best, 10/10 cloud being predominant and heavy rain showers experienced.

Navigation by D/R and Map reading on way out and by D/R and homing bearings on return.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
AC Green, RAF – Wireless Operator.
AC Shuttleworth, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:25 – Landed 01:05
Flight Time 02:40

03/06/1940 – Bombing Attack on Target A.28 DUSSELDORF
Eight aircraft detailed to carry out individual attacks, and all carried same bomb load 1.e. 8 – 250lbs. G.P. N.D.T.., 1 – 250lbs. 8hr delay, and one case of incendiaries each.

PCB.339 attacked the target in a level bombing run from 11,000 feet bombs were dropped in a stick of 9 and a number of direct hits were observed and a small fire was started. PCB.341 located the target and precision bombed it with two sticks, height 9,000 feet. The only results observed were those of the incendiaries which burst about 200 yards West of Target.

PCB.346 reports that the target was located without difficulty. All bombs were dropped in one stick from a height of 9,000 feet. Owing to glare of searchlights, bursts were not observed, although it was thought that the target was most likely hit.

PCB.347 reports he carried out his attack from 12,000 feet. A stick of 5 – 250lbs. Bombs being dropped on the target and a further 5 dropped on a wharf at UDESHEIM which could be seen quite clearly by the aid of a parachute flare.

PCB.348 had the misfortune to develop engine trouble when only 5 miles from the target. Searchlights were bombed in the vicinity of KREFOLD two bombs and one container of incendiaries dropped on what appeared to be a factory in VENLOO, hits observed and a fire started.

PCB.353 All bombs were dropped in a stick and were seen to straddle the target, which they found already burning. The incendiaries themselves fell right beside the fire at the target and greatly intensified same.

PCB.354 reports dropping a stick of 9 – -250lbs. G.P. and one container of incendiaries across the target. Near misses were observed and fires were started in the proximity of the target. A dull red fire emitting clouds of black smoke was also seen near the Eastern boundary. Owing to the industrial haze accurate observations could not be made.

PCB.355 reports that the target was located from 10,000 feet at which height he carried out a level bombing attack. On the first run over, and attempt to drop the bombs in a stick failed, so a second run was made and bombs released in a salvo.

Direct hits were observed an explosion occurred followed by a large file, which could still be seen burning a long time after the aircraft had set course for Base.

All aircraft crews report very heavy A.A. Fire in the region of ROTTERDAM airport. There appeared to be many misleading lights in the target area. Presumably the idea being that these would be bombed instead of the real objective. Outside of these odd lights the black-out over the whole of the area was extremely good. Some curious flares were observed off the Danish coast in position 51° 40’ N, 02° 36’ E. These appeared to be stationed on the water.

Very little flak was experienced by any of the aircraft in the target area and such as was, was not very accurate. For miles around the target area searchlights were in great numbers and were very active. Due to ground haze, they appeared to have difficulty in locating the aircraft, but pilots report that if they were held for any short period, no trouble was experienced in getting out of same again. PCB339 and PCB.353 report that thy each had a single engine aircraft fly near them while approaching the target area.
The night was good, there being practically no cloud during any part of the route, a slight ground haze made the target fairly hard to locate Fog was encountered on returning to Base, and some aircraft had to be directed to other aerodromes.

Navigation was by D/R and Map reading on the outward journey and by D’R and homing bearings on the return trip.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K
Raid No. PCB.354 A.28

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
Sgt. Green, RAF – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. John Dowds, RAF 632780 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:30 – Landed 02:55
Flight Time 04:25

05/06/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Cross-Roads and Marshalling Yards at CAMBRAI
The seven aircraft were detailed to carry out individual attacks on above target.

Two aircraft carried 6 – 500lbs. bombs each (GP) while remaining five carried 12 – 250lbs. bombs each (GP).
PCB.367 reports that the target was located from the lights of flares dropped. The target was precision bombed from 9,000ft, one 500lbs. G.P. bomb was dropped on South East road junction. A stick of 3 – 500lbs. bombs was then dropped on the road running North East out of town, results not observed due to the local ground haze.

PCB.368 also located that target with aid of parachute flares and carried out a shallow dive attack from 10,000 to 7,500ft, from which height bombs released. Two runs made, a stick of 6 – 250lbs bombs dropped on each run. Sticks seen on main crossroads after each run.

PCB.369 failed to locate given target, so carried out attack on enemy searchlights. Convoy bombed in vicinity of target. Bursts seen, but results unobserved owing to widespread haze.

PCB.370 made run across target from 9,000ft and dropped 6 – -500lbs. bombs in a slow stick. Hits again not seen due to local haze on ground.

PCB.371 attacked railway line and junction at CAMBRAI, dropping all bombs in slow stick, and estimated to have straddled target. Haze again interfered with observations etc..

PCB.372 reports that owing to an error in identifying target DOUAI bombed instead of CAMRAI.

Six 250lbs. bombs dropped in level attack at 6,000ft. One bomb observed along side of railway yard. Next a factory on South side of town attacked and remainder of bombs dropped in two runs. Four bursts observed some 200 feet short of target.

PCB.373 attacked WSW and SSW approaches to town dropped 12 – 250lbs in two sticks. Haze and glare of searchlights prevented results being observed.

Aerodrome on West side of DOUAI reported blazing fiercely after heavy bombing. Only little inaccurate light flak reported over target area, but heavy over DOUAI. Searchlights numerous at all town centres. With about 30 around target itself. A clear sky encountered over whole journey, but heavy ground haze made observation difficult.
Navigation by D\R and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K
Raid No. PCB.371 Cambrai

F/O William Harcourt Coleman, RAF/ RNZAF 39781/ NZ2526 – Pilot.
P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Norman Wilson Brown, RAF 518807 – Observer.
Sgt. Green, RAF – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Shuttleworth, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:25 – Landed 01:45
Flight Time 03:20

25/07/1940 – Bombing Attacks on targets, F.18, M.434, and KASSEL
Nine Wellington aircraft were detailed to carry out the above operations. The Squadron suffered its third loss since began operations when CB.661 (F/O Coleman) failed to return. CB.668 returned to base after being out for 2 1\2hrs, due to electrical trouble.

Total bomb load carried was:- 40 – 250lbs G.P. bombs fused N.D.T., 7 – 250lbs G.P. bombs fused 6hr delay 3 – 500lbs G.P. bombs fused N.D.T., 7 – containers of 4lbs incendiaries.

CB.654 reports, original target A.19 GOTHER not attacked due to low visibility, so aerodrome at KASSEL attacked. Bombs dropped from 12,000ft in level attack. Hits unobserved due to concentrated flak and searchlights.

One 250lbs bomb dropped on flare path of aerodrome at LIPPSTADT by CB.655. Fell just outside aerodrome. Flare path extinguished and remained so. Stick of 4 – 250lbs, G.P.’s and 1 – S.B.C. dropped from 7,000ft on target F.19 from S.E. to N.W. Two fell short, one burst on boundary road to S.E., one and incendiaries hit buildings in area. Large fires started, burning red, green and orange. Explosions in fires lit up aircraft at 7,000ft. above target. Five bundles Nickels dropped between KASSEL and GOTHA.

CB.656 reports, unable to locate F.18, owing to 6/10 low cloud at 2,000ft. Attacked target F.19 in dive bombing attack from 10-8,000 feet, releasing stick of 5 – 250lbs bombs fused N.D.T. and one container of incendiaries. Results unobserved due to light and heavy flak and searchlights, violent evasive action taken.

Results not observed by CB.659 owing to ground haze and intense searchlight and heavy flak activity.

A dive attack made by CB.660 from 11,000ft – 8,000ft the bombs being dropped in stick at base of dive. Nil results observed owing to intense ground activity

CB.666 unable to locate target due to ground haze, stick of 5 – 250lbs bombs burst on flare path at DUISBURG. Fires started, flare path at EINDHOVEN also bombed with 6 – 250lbs bombs and incendiaries. Run up excellent. Results not observed due to cloud. Time 00.30 hours.

CB.667 reports, bombs had to be released in order to evade A.A. fire. No results observed.

Owing to electrical failure CB.668 returned to base after 1hrs flying. No bombs dropped.

Balloons flying at all main towns, marked increase in number of flare paths to target, thought to be dummies.
A.A. fire heavy over SCHIPOL, ROTTERDAM, KASSEL, GOTHA and intense in the RUHR. Searchlights active over whole area. Three enemy fighters seen by CB.659 over PADERBORN, no attack made. 5/10 cloud experienced most of way and local haze persistent over RUHR etc. Cold frost met on reaching English coast on return, and heavy and low cloud.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3172 AA-?
Raid No. CB.667 M.434

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Charles Aylmer Pownall, RAF/ RNZAF 36248/ NZ2401 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Brett, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. Sills, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. John Skelly, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Thomas James Desmond Baber, RNZAF NZ39857 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:45 – Landed 02:45
Flight Time 05:00

28/07/1940 – Bombing Attacks on targets A.8, A.73, and M.434.
Night not good for nine Wellington aircraft detailed from this Squadron to carry out individual bombing attacks on above targets. 10/10 cloud experienced as well as heavy ground haze over Germany, making observations difficult.
Total number of bombs carried by aircraft was as follows:- 46 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs fused N.D.T. 11 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs fused ½ – 18hr delay. 8 – 500lbs. G.P. bombs fused N.D.T., and 7 cases of 4lbs. incendiaries.

CB.676 reports, bombs were dropped in one stick from 11,000 feet. Bursts not observed owing to cloud and searchlights. Rear Gunner observed a small fire on leaving the target area.

Bombs dropped on target by CB.677 – targets A.75, bursts unobserved due to haze and searchlights tec.,

CB.678 reports a stick was dropped from 16,000ft. across the docks on the North side of the river at HAMBURG. Nil results observed owing to intense ground activity and cloud layer.

Found impossible to locate either target A.8 or A.9 by CB.679, due to 8/10 cloud at 9,000ft. Aerodrome at STADE attacked, dropping 4-500lbs. bombs. After the attack red hanger lights extinguished, but goose neck flare path remained lit. Dived to 1,000 feet, made two circuits, while front and rear gunners heavily machine gunned flare path and hangers.

Target not located by CB.682. Bombed twin blast furnaces in RUHR. Stick of bombs appeared to straddle target. A fire started near furnaces by incendiaries. CB.683, nil results to report. Returned to base owing to adverse weather conditions.

CB.684 unable to locate target A.75 due to ground haze, so decided to attack one of aerodromes on Dutch coast. Port motor failed while looking for suitable target, so bombs jettisoned in sea. An S.O.S. was sent, but homed by MANSTON, and when within sight of MANSTON Port engine picked up, enabling aircraft to land at base.

Primary target A.75 also not located by CB.685 owing to bad visibility and cloud. Apparent blast furnace 15 miles West of A.75 attacked and also WESEL aerodrome. Which was being used. Results unobserved due to searchlights, but bombs should have dropped on flare path just as an aircraft was landing.

CB.688 reports , bombs dropped in two sticks. Only one bomb observed to burst, which was estimated to drop approximately 4 miles South of Hamm.
Due to ground haze no important observations were obtained. A.A. fire intense and fairly accurate in all target areas and searchlights active. Severe weather conditions over Dutch coast. Navigation by D/R, visual observation and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 dnc AA-K
Raid No. CB.683 A.73

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Charles Aylmer Pownall, RAF/ RNZAF 36248/ NZ2401 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Brett, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. Sills, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. John Skelly, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Thomas James Desmond Baber, RNZAF NZ39857 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:50 – Landed 00:25
Flight Time 02:35

03/08/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Target A.71 at HORST
Nine Wellington aircraft from this unit detailed to carry out individual attacks on above, but due to heavy ground haze over target area, attacks had to be carried out on various other targets, with success. Low 10/10 cloud encountered on returning to base and aircraft directed to other aerodromes. CB.692 crashed when attempting a forced landing, due to engine failure. The Captain, S/Ldr. Collet, was killed, but the five remaining members of the crew escaped with injuries.

A combined bomb load was carried.
Stick of bombs and S.B.C. dropped by CB.693 down flare path at approximate position 51° 42’ North, 6° 53’ East.

CB.695 located target and bombed. Results of 250lbs bombs not observed, but incendiaries seen to miss target.

CB.695 almost reached primary target, but owing to engine trouble, returned and bombed SCHIPOL aerodrome, believed successful. Height 19,500ft on North Westerly course. Four bundles nickels dropped near target.
CB.696 reports, extensive large fires started by incendiaries in target area. Results not seen of 250’s.

CB.697 located target after search of 45 minutes and dropped stick of 5 – 250lbs bombs and one S.B.C. at 00.15hrs from 12,000ft in level attack. Two bursts observed amongst lights in target area and extinguished same. Incendiaries failed to function, reason not known. Line of six Blast Furnaces on Eastern outskirts of GLADBECK also attacked with stick of 4 – 250lbs N.D.T. bombs from 12,000ft. Four burst observed 200 yards South of Blast Furnace.

CB.698 failed to locate primary target owing to ground haze, and searchlight activity over area. Marshalling yards at HALTERN attacked. All bombs dropped in one stick, bursts seen and explosions followed, and considerable damage thought to be done.

CB.699 failed to locate target owing to ground haze and searchlights. SCHIPOL aerodrome attacked from 4,000ft. Results not observed owing to intense opposition.

CB.700 did not locate primary target owing to haze and searchlights, but bombs dropped from 10,000ft in one stick on aerodrome at BUER. Two bursts observed. What appeared to be dummy Blast Furnaces, seen in target area, and usual light and heavy flak experienced, seems to be more intense around SCHIPOL. Searchlights intense and very active. CB.693 followed back to English coast by three unidentified aircraft. Weather poor, low visibility, 10/10 cloud as low as 300ft on return. Navigation by D/R, W/T fixes, and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3159 AA-K
Raid No. CB.693 A.71 (Wessel attacked as secondary target)

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Charles Aylmer Pownall, RAF/ RNZAF 36248/ NZ2401 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Brett, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. Sills, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Thomas James Desmond Baber, RNZAF NZ39857 – Front Gunner.
Sgt. John Skelly, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:45 – Landed 03:00
Flight Time 05:15

06/08/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets A.73 and A.28.
Night not good for nine Wellington aircraft detailed from this Squadron to carry out individual bombing attacks on above targets. 10/10 cloud experienced as well as heavy ground haze over Germany, making observations difficult.
Total number of bombs carried by aircraft was as follows:- 46 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs fused N.D.T. 11 – 250lbs. G.P. bombs fused ½ – 18hr delay. 8 – 500lbs. G.P. bombs fused N.D.T., and 7 cases of 4lbs. incendiaries.
CB.676 reports, bombs were dropped in one stick from 11,000 feet. Bursts not observed owing to cloud and searchlights. Rear Gunner observed a small fire on leaving the target area.

Bombs dropped on target by CB.677 – targets A.75, bursts unobserved due to haze and searchlights etc.,

CB.678 reports a stick was dropped from 16,000ft. across the docks on the North side of the river at HAMBURG. Nil results observed owing to intense ground activity and cloud layer.

Found impossible to locate either target A.* or A.9 by CB.679, due to 8/10 cloud at 9,000ft. Aerodrome at STADE attacked, dropping 4-500lbs. bombs. After the attack red hanger lights extinguished, but goose neck flare path remained lit. Dived to 1,000 feet, made two circuits, while front and rear gunners heavily machine gunned flare path and hangers.

Target not located by CB.682. Bombed twin blast furnaces in RUHR. Stick of bombs appeared to straddle target. A fire started near furnaces by incendiaries. CB.683, nil results to report. Returned to base owing to adverse weather conditions.

CB.684 unable to locate target A.75 due to ground haze, so decided to attack one of aerodromes on Dutch coast. Port motor failed while looking for suitable target, so bombs jettisoned in sea. An S.O.S. was sent, but homed by MANSTON, and when within sight of MANSTON Port engine picked up, enabling aircraft to land at base.

Primary target A.75 also not located by CB.685 owing to bad visibility and cloud. Apparent blast furnace 15 miles West of A.75 attacked and also WESEL aerodrome. Which was being used. Results unobserved due to searchlights, but bombs should have dropped on flare path just as an aircraft was landing.

CB.688 reports , bombs dropped in two sticks. Only one bomb observed to burst, which was estimated to drop approximately 4 miles South of Hamm.
Due to ground haze no important observations were obtained. A.A. fire intense and fairly accurate in all target areas and searchlights active. Severe weather conditions over Dutch coast. Navigation by D/R, visual observation and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3172 AA-?
Raid No. CB.725 A.28 (Eindhaven attacked as secondary target)

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Charles Aylmer Pownall, RAF/ RNZAF 36248/ NZ2401 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Robert Henry Hughes, RAFVR 550880 – Observer.
Sgt. Sills, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Thomas James Desmond Baber, RNZAF NZ39857 – Front Gunner.
Sgt. John Skelly, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 21:45 – Landed 01:50
Flight Time 04:05

20/09/1940 – Bombing Attacks Against Enemy Territory
Nine Wellington aircraft wee detailed to carry out the above operations. The bomb load was made up of 250lbs. bombs and containers of 4lbs. incendiaries.

CB.157 reports that a large fire was started in docks standing alongside No. 1 basin (with lockgate) and seen to burn for 50 minutes, and grow to size of a hangar. Lockgates were hit with a stick of 10 – 250lbs. bombs.

CB.158 reports that all bombs were dropped in one stick bursting down dock area between the two basins. One large fire started. Still burning 20 minutes later.

CB.159 reports that one stick laid across docks observed to make direct hits. Fires and explosions followed which could be seen on second climb. One stick five N.D.T. and one S.B.C. laid longitudinal across 15/20,000 tone vessel. First bomb 40-50yds astern, remainder either direct hits or very near misses.

CB.160 reports that bombs were dropped in one stick across harbour entrance. Large fires observed on N.E. side of harbour mouth started by incendiaries.

CB.162 reports eight bombs burst in target area though no fires started. A large fire was started in the deck area but was apparently caused by a machine bombing at exactly the same time.

CB.164 dropped one stick of six 250lbs bombs on N.W. heading which was seen to burst in vicinity of tidal basin. One stick of five 250lbs bombs and one S.B.C. dropped on S.E. heading was seen to burst on jetty of fish harbour. Incendiary fires observed to seaward side of fort on north side of harbour entrance.

CB.165 dropped first stick in Nos. 1 and 2 basins heading 180° approximately. A second stick and one S.B.C. was dropped in No.3 Basin heading 045° approximately.

One stick and S.B.C was dropped by CB.163 on Eastern side of outer harbour wharves. Bombs exploded, but no fires observed.

Several large fires were seen and were visible for miles after leaving target area. CB.157 reports that a plane was shot down north of the docks at 22.35 hours. Barge concentration seen on OSTEND-BRUGES CANAL. Submarine or “E” boat observed by CB159 signalling in morse short distances from Belgium coast. This aircraft also encountered flak barrage in mid-channel. Parachute flare dropped and two searchlights and light flak, presumably from British convoy, observed by CB160.

Fairly heavy and accurate A.A. fire encountered in all areas.
Searchlights were fairly active, although not particularly accurate.
One ME.110 was encountered by CB.157 off target coast, but owing to the speed of the former, no contact was made. Two unidentified aircraft were encountered over target area by CB.159 but no attack made.
Weather was good in target areas, although patches of cloud were encountered over North Sea.
Navigation was by D/R, visual fixes, map reading and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3277 AA-Y
Raid No. CB.162

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
Sgt. A.P. Jones, RAF – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Scrivener, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. Frederick James Read, RNZAF NZ39871 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Emeny, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
P/O Edward Thomas Wilcox, RAF 78758 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:10 – Landed 00:40
Flight Time 02:30

23/09/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets at Berlin, Le Havre and Hamburg
Ten Wellington aircraft of this Unit were detailed to carry out attacks against the targets above. A mixed bomb load was carried and was made up of 250lbs bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs bombs, delayed action, and containers of incendiaries.

CB.167 reports four fires started on dock area. Minor explosions were seen on leaving.
One stick and S.B.C. was dropped by CB.163 on Eastern side of outer harbour wharves. Bobs exploded, but no fires observed.
Several large fires were seen and were visible for miles after leaving target area.

CB.157 reports that a plane was shot down north of the docks at 22.35 hours. Barge concentration seen on OSTEND-BRUGES CANAL. Submarine or “E” boat observed by CB.159 signalling in morse short distance from Belgian coast. This aircraft also encountered flak barrage in mod-channel. Parachute flare dropped, and two searchlights and light flak, presumably from British convoy, observed by CB.160.

Fairly heavy and accurate A.A. fire encountered in all areas.
Searchlights were fairly active, although not particularly accurate.
One ME.110 was encountered by CB.157 off target coast, but owing to the speed of the former, no contact was made.

Two unidentified aircraft were encountered over target area by CB.159 but no attack was made.
Weather was good in target areas, although patches of cloud were encountered over the North Sea.
Navigation was by D/R, visual fixes, map reading and homing bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c R.3277 AA-Y
Raid No. CB.167 Le Havre

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
Sgt. A.P. Jones, RAF – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Scrivener, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. Frederick James Read, RNZAF NZ39871 – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Emney, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
P/O Edward Thomas Wilcox, RAF 78758 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 19:10 – Landed 00:10
Flight Time 05:00

02/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets M.116 and A.69
Ten Wellington aircraft carried out the above attacks. A mixed bomb load was carried and was made up of 500lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs delayed action, containers of 4;bs. Incendiaries, while CB.236 carried one flash bomb.

CB.226 failed to locate target and bombs were brought back as no military target could be located.

CB.227 reports that bombs were dropped in a single stick across ZWISCHEICHEUR AERODROME. Small fires started by incendiaries.
Results were not observed by CB.232 owing to nine tenths cloud.

CB.234 reports that target was not attacked owing to 10/10 cloud extending over route half way over North Sea to target area.

Owing to very low cloud, no definite results were seen by CB.235. Large flashes were seen reflected on clouds which kept going for about 20 mins.
No results were observed by CB.236.

CB.237 reports that bombs were observed to burst short of target by 400 yards.

CB.238 reports that a stick of bombs were dropped on DE KOOY AERODROME. First bombs seen to burst short, but remainder on aerodrome.

CB.239 dropped one stick of bombs on red obstruction lights at Aerodrome at WESSEL. Results not observed owing to cloud, but there was a glow against the clouds resembling a fire.

Bomb bursts were observed by CB.240

Large fire seen in vicinity of AMSTERDAM. Flak ships observed off Dutch coast for 20 miles.
Heavy and light A.A. fire, fairly accurate, experienced in all target areas.
Slight searchlight activity but ineffective owing to cloud.
No enemy aircraft were seen.
Weather was very poor; heavy cloud over whole of journey.
Navigation was mainly D/R, with Astro in one instance.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2136 AA-?
Raid No. CB.226 M.116

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Clive King Saxelby, RAF 36275 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Henderson, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. McCrum, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Walter Lionel Gosden, RNZAF NZ39859 – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Humphries, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 19:20 – Landed 00:30
Flight Time 05:10

05/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets aat ROTTERDAM and FLUSHING
Two Wellington aircraft of this Unit carried out the above attacks. The bomb load was a mixed one and consisted of 500lbs. Bombs, fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs delayed action, and one container of 4lbs. Incendiaries.
CB.252 reports bursts observed on dock side on S.W. edge of town. Fires started, apparently buildings.

S/Ldr. Bain reports that bombs fell short of basin 100 feet to 200 feet. Many recurring explosions, as though bomb dump ad been hit. Visible for 10-15 mins.

White flashing beacon near HAMMSTEDE.
Fairly intense light and heavy flak experienced in the target areas.
Searchlights were numerous, but aircraft were not held.
Fighter patrols seen around ROTTERDAM. Numerous cases of a 3-star red verey lights being fired when approached every time searchlights formed a cone.
Weather was fair over target. Cloud base 500-800 feet inside English Coast, visibility 1-1 miles; steady rain.
Navigation was by D/R, H/F and M/F bearings.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2736 AA-A
Raid No. CB.252 Rotterdam

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Clive King Saxelby, RAF 36275 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Henderson, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. McCrum, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Humphries, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Frederick James Read, RNZAF NZ39871 – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 18:30 – Landed 21:45
Flight Time 03:15

08/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets A.10, Marshalling Yards Gremburg and Cologne
Ten Wellington aircraft were detailed to carry out individual bombing attacks on the above targets. The bomb load was mixed and consisted of 500lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250 lbs. bombs, delayed action, and containers of 4lbs. incendiaries.

CB.253 reports a stick of four bombs dropped across target. Bursts observed, two fires started which burned until aircraft was out of sight of target.

CB.255 reached HAMBURG and dropped a flare over the town. A stick of bombs was dropped over the target but bursts were not observed due to searchlight activity.

CB.256 dropped in one stick and bursts observed in target area. Incendiaries seen to burn but no fires resulted.

CB.257 reports hits or near misses on target. Explosions unseen due to intense A.A. fire. Two fires seen burning afterwards.

F/Lt. Gilbert reports bombs fell short of target in docks on Northern side of the river. Observations of bombs uncertain due to heavy A.A. fire.

CB.258 dropped bombs in a level stick at 11,500 feet. Incendiary bombs started three small fires and a medium yellow explosion. Two bombs dropped on aerodrome at OLDENBURG; lights extinguished.

CB.259 reports one large fire started by stick of bombs. Smaller fires caused by incendiaries. Fires still burning after ten minutes.

CB.260 dropped one stick from 10,000 feet across target area.

CB.270 reports that bombs were seen to burst on target area. Three explosions seen in centre of incendiaries.

S/Ldr. Bain reports extensive and brilliant red fires visible for 60-70 miles.
Number of flare-paths seen at various parts of route. Flak ship North of WILHEMSHAVEN two miles off coast, 52* 50’N,04* 35’E.
Intense heavy and light A.A. fire was experienced on way to target and also in target areas.

Searchlights were fairly intense and accurate.
A number of enemy aircraft seen. CB.256 overtaken by two aircraft, believed ME.110, over target area. Three single engined machines, believed to be ME.109, circled this aircraft fr ten minutes during dummy runs over target. No attacks.
Weather was clear over target areas. Heavy cloud experienced over North Sea on return journey.
Navigation was by D/R, Q.D.M’s, Homing Bearings, and Astro.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2736 AA-A
Raid No. CB.270 Marshalling Yards Gremburg.

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Clive King Saxelby, RAF 36275 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Henderson, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. McCrum, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Humphries, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Gosden, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 19:10 – Landed 23:35
Flight Time 04:25

16/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Target D.3 at KIEL
Nine Wellington aircraft carried out the above attacks. One of these aircraft, captained by P/O. Morton, crashed in Cumberland after having completed operations.
The bomb load consisted of 500lbs. S.A.P. bombs, 1/10 sec. delay.

CB.312 reports that a large red fire was observed.

CB.313 bombed docks in KIEL, but results were no observed.

CB.315 reports that results were not observed owing to low cloud and gun flashes.

CB.322 reports that target was observed in floating dock. Bomb bursts seen on target.

On the first run, CB.323 dropped a stick of two bombs which burst in water one on each side of GNEISENAU. A salvo of two bombs was dropped on second run and burst either side of the jetty of target. Heavy orange explosion was seen.

CB.324 reports that primary target was obscured by 10/10 cloud. Secondary target clear and easily identified. Good run up and bombs aimed accurately but bursts were not observed.

CB.325 dropped one stick from 11,500 feet. Bursts seen. Bombs fell N.E. of target on quays.

CB.326 dropped bombs in one stick on target. Bursts observed, but no pinpointed in relation to target due to cloud layer, but definitely in immediate vicinity of target. Rectangle of red lights 800 yds. x 600yds. sen in vicinity of LECK. Green light flashed from end like Aldis. Four red lights in a line North and South, equally spaced, across BORKUM. These flashed for one second at eight second intervals. Two searchlights believed to be on HELIGOLAND.
Fair amount of heavy A.A. fire. Fairly accurate. Searchlights were active, but ineffective owing to cloud. One enemy aircraft seen in NEUMUNSTER area. Believed to be HE.113.

Weather was clear over target areas. Heavy cloud experienced on return journey.
Navigation was by D/R, Astro, and MF/DF.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2736 AA-A
Raid No. CB.313 D.3 (Docks at Kiel attacked as secondary target)

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Eric Jackson, RAF 44194 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Henderson, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. McCrum, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Humphries, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Gosden, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 18:20 – Landed 01:10
Flight Time 06:50

21/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Targets D.2 and A.28
Nine Wellington aircraft of this Unit were detailed to carry out the above attacks. CB.349 crashed and was burnt out at MANSTON, the crew escaping without injury. The aircraft captained by F/Lt. Gilbert lost port airscrew on return journey and crashed while trying to effect forced landing in fog. The crew suffered slight injury. A mixed bomb load was carried and was made up of 500lbs. S.A.P., 250lbs. fused N.D.T., 250lbs. delayed action, and containers of incendiaries.

CB.332 reports that bombs and incendiaries fell on docks in target area. Fire started which was seen for 30 minutes.

CB.335 dropped one stick of bombs in target area. Target not identified due to extreme haze. Explosions observed for 10mins. after leaving target.

CB.336 dropped one stick from 10,500 feet across target area. Bomb bursts seen but target not identified. Bombs fell on wharves and docks.

CB.343 reports that bombs were seen to burst in dock area.

CB.344 reports target area hit.

CB.345 dropped bombs in one stick. Bomb aimer identified docks but could not see the ship, so used neighbouring jetty as aiming point. Bursts were observed, followed by seven explosions, but visibility was insufficient to pinpoint these.

CB.349 reports numerous fires and a series of small explosions observed whilst locating target: visible for 10 mins after bombing until obscured by cloud.

F/Lt. Gilbert reports that results were not observed owing to searchlight glare. Three 500lbs. S.A.P. dropped to lighten aircraft to facilitate escape from searchlights and A.A. Incendiaries retained and dropped on railway siding N.W. of HAMBURG. Fire resulted, with a few small explosions.

P/O Wright reports large fires started, and 44 heavy explosions observed lasting about 10mins. Target burning steadily after setting course home.
Number of flare paths and boundary lights in area between EMDEN and WILHELNSHAVEN, also dummy aerodrome 5 miles S.W. HAMBURG. Balloons observed in DUSSELDORF area at 9000 feet.

Intense and accurate heavy A.A. fire experienced.

Searchlights were very active. In HAMBURG area they appeared to operate in groups, each group controlled by a pair of searchlights either on one mounting or on two mountings very close together and projecting parallel beams, one white, the other electric blue.

P/O. Wright reports being challenged by three enemy aircraft at 2000 feet over the Dutch coast. Stern attack by one, but avoided him by dive into cloud.
Weather was hazy over target areas. Heavy cloud encountered on return journey. Navigation was by D/R, Astro, and Q.D.M’s.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2736 AA-A
Raid No. CB.332 D.2

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Eric Jackson, RAF 44194 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Henderson, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. McCrum, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Humphries, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Gosden, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 17:30 – Landed 23:50
Flight Time 06:20

23/10/1940 – Bombing Attacks on Berlin, Potsdam Station, D.148.
Five Wellington aircraft were detailed to carry out the above attacks. One, CB.362, captained by P/O Sanderson, failed to return. A mixed bomb load was carried and consisted of 1000lbs. Bomb, delayed action, 500lbs. Bombs delayed action, 500lbs. Bombs fused N.D.T., 250lbs delayed action, 250lbs. bombs fused N.D.T., containers of incendiaries, while CB.359 carried one flash bomb.

CB.358 reports results were not observed owing to two layers of cloud.

CB.359 attacked flarepath probably east of Berlin, bursts unobserved, but incendiaries observed burning 300 yards short of flarepath.

CB361 reports bombs seen to burst in vicinity of NEURUPPIN Aerodrome. No fires started.

NO results were observed by CB.368 due to intensity of searchlights.
EELDE Aerodrome lit with electric flare path and boundary lights. Red beacon at decoy aerodrome. Beacon flashing C.F. 530 3N 0450E. White beacon flashing 5 secs. Approximately AMELAND.

A.A. fire was heavy and accurate.
Searchlights were few, and not very accurate owing to cloud. No enemy aircraft were seen. Heavy cloud was experienced in all areas. Navigation was by D/R, Astro and Q.D.M’s.

Wellington Mk.1c T.2736 AA-A
Raid No. CB.361 Potsdam station (Neuruppin aerodrome attacked as secondary target)

P/O Ian Ronald Gow, RAF 40820 – Pilot.
P/O Eric Jackson, RAF 44194 – 2nd Pilot.
Sgt. Henderson, RAFVR – Observer.
Sgt. McCrum, RAFVR – Wireless Operator.
Sgt. Humphries, RAFVR – Front Gunner.
Sgt. Gosden, RAF – Rear Gunner .

Take Off 22:40 – Landed 06:10
Flight Time 07:30