July 1944

Mepal
1.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests and Night Flying Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Twenty Four aircraft were standing by to attack the works supply site at Beauvoir, but the operation was postponed owing to weather.

2.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty three out of twenty four aircraft detailed took off in daylight to attack the construction works supply site at Beauvoir.  All aircraft successfully bombed the target and a concentrated raid developed.  Opposition from A.A. fire was slight.

3.7.44
Non-Operational Flying
.  Adverse weather prevented any flying during the whole of the day.

4.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.

4/5.7.44
Operational Flying. 
Twenty four aircraft were standing by to attack the constructional works at Biennais, but the operation was postponed until daylight.

5.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  The same twenty four aircraft detailed yesterday continued to stand by to attack Biennais, but this was later cancelled.
Administration.  NZ411411 P/O. S. Kennedy and crew arrived on posting from 31 Base.

5/6.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty four aircraft took off as detailed to attack the constructional works at Watten.  All were successful in bombing the target, and a good raid was reported.  Moderate to heavy A.A. fire was encountered, but there was no fighter opposition.  In addition, four aircraft were detailed to lay mines in the Kattegat, but this operation was cancelled.

6.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests were carried out.

6/7.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty one aircraft were detailed to attack the Vaires marshalling yard, but the operation was cancelled owing to weather conditions.

7.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests and Night Cross Country exercises were flown.

7/8.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty one aircraft were detailed to attack the Vaires marshalling yard.  Three aircraft returned early with technical trouble, but the other eighteen aircraft, in good visibility, were able to identify the target visually, and the bombing appeared to be accurate.  Very little opposition was encountered.

8.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Administration.  NZ425948 F/Sgt. Smith, M. and NZ428793 F/Sgt. Mulcahy, C. and crews arrived on posting from 31 Base.

8/9.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty five aircraft were detailed to attack the constructional works site at Linziex.  The operation was postponed owing to weather conditions.

9.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  The twenty five aircraft detailed on the previous day took off to attack the constructional works site at Linzeux in daylight.  All aircraft bombed through cloud, using navigational aids.  A.A. fire opposition was reported as slight, although one aircraft suffered considerable damage when over the target.  There was no opposition from enemy fighters.

10.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Twenty seven aircraft took off at dawn to attack Nucourt constructional works site, all aircraft bombing through 10/10th cloud, using navigational aids, but the raid appeared to be scattered.  Slight opposition from A.A. fire was encountered.
Administration.  P/O. W. Hadley (NZ426041) and crew, and P/O. I. Blance (NZ421469) and crew arrived on posting from 31 Base.

11.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests and one Cross Country flight were carried out.

11/12.7.44
Operational Flying.
 Twenty five aircraft were standing by to attack Vaires marshalling yard, but the operation was postponed until daylight.

12.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests and Fighter Affiliation were carried out.
Operational Flying.  The same twenty five aircraft detailed earlier took off to attack the Vaires marshalling yard in daylight.  All aircraft reached the target area, but only two identified the marshalling yard and bombed as ordered.  The remaining crews abandoned their mission as instructed by the Master Bomber, and brought their bombs back to base, owing to 10/10ths cloud obscuring the target.  Considerable heavy A.A. fire was encountered, but all aircraft returned safely.

13.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Twenty four aircraft were standing by to attack the marshalling yard at Villeneuve-Saint-Georges, but the operation was cancelled owing to poor weather.
Administration.  NZ421383 P/O. T. May and crew arrived on posting from 31 Base.

14.7.44
Operational Flying.
  The Squadron’s effort was increased to twenty seven aircraft which continued to stand by to attack Vaires, but after repeated postponements, the weather finally caused a cancellation of the operation.

15.7.44
Non-Operational Flying
.  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Thirty aircraft were standing by to attack the marshalling yard at Vaires, but the operation was again cancelled.

15/16.7.44
Operational Flying
.  Eighteen aircraft took off as detailed to attack the marshalling yard at Chalons Sur Marne.  All aircraft bombed the target and a good attack was reported, most crews being able to identify the marshalling yard visually.  There was no A.A. fire opposition, but two aircraft had inconclusive combats with enemy fighters.

On the same night ten aircraft took off to attack the constructional works site at Bois Des Jardins.  All aircraft bombed the target, but a scattered raid was reported owing to eight to ten tenths cloud.  No opposition was encountered.

16.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Twenty seven aircraft were detailed to attack the marshalling yard at Vaires, but once again the operation was cancelled.

17.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  The twenty seven aircraft previously detailed took off to attack the Vaires marshalling yard in daylight, but the aircraft were recalled shortly after setting course.  On landing they were re-fuelled and kept standing by to attack a tactical target.

18.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Twenty eight aircraft took off, as detailed, to make a dawn attack on the village of Cagny, in Northern France where the enemy had large concentrations of armour and troops situated.  This attack was in direct support of the Allied 2nd Army, and all crews were successful in bombing the target with the aid of markers and a very concentrated raid was reported.  Moderate A.A. fire was encountered, but only one of our aircraft suffered damage, this was captained by NZ421549 F/S. Moriarty, D. who was injured on the scalp and left eye, by fragments of perspex or shell splinters caused by an A.A. shell which exploded in the cockpit.  In spite of his serious injuries, F/Sgt. Moriarty safely flew his aircraft back to base.

18/19.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty eight aircraft took off to attack the aircraft works at Aulnoye, one of those originally detailed being withdrawn.  All crews were successful in attacking the target, and the bombing was well controlled by the Master Bomber.  A concentrated raid developed, and several crews were able to identify the target visually.  A.A. opposition was very slight, but enemy fighters were more active, and one aircraft (Captain NZ411411 F/O. G. Kennedy), claimed to have shot down two enemy aircraft.  One of our aircraft (Captain NZ405801 A/F/L. J. Myers) failed to return.

19.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.
Administration.  NZ422917 P/O. C. Glossop and crew arrived on posting from No.31 Base.

19/20.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty five aircraft were detailed to attack Homberg, in the Ruhr, but this was cancelled, and the aircraft continued to stand by for a new target.

20.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air Tests were carried out.

20/21.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty six aircraft took off, as detailed, to attack the oil refinery at Homberg.  Nineteen aircraft were successful in bombing the target, with the aid of markers, which seemed well concentrated.  Two good explosions were seen and smoke came up from the target area.  Heavy A.A. fire was moderate, but fighters were very active, eight combats taking place.  Seven aircraft failed to return, the captains were AUS22776 W/O. Gilmour, H., NZ428819 F/S. Howell, E., NZ421829 F/S. Mackay, K., NZ422057 F/S. Davidson, N., NZ42488 W/O. Whittington, H., NZ413219 F/S. Roche, G. & NZ414560 P/O. Burtt, H.

21.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Cross country flights and air tests were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Nineteen aircraft were detailed to stand by for a daylight operation, but this was cancelled.

22.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests were carried out.
Administration.  AUS18780 P/O. S. Wilson and crew arrived on posting from 31 Base.

22/23.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Six aircraft were detailed to lay mines in the Kattegat area.  All aircraft dropped their mines successfully, and crews reported an uneventful trip.

In addition twelve aircraft were required to attack a bombing target, but this was cancelled.

23.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests were carried out.

23/24.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty aircraft took off as detailed to attack Kiel, and all successfully bombed the target.  A concentrated raid was reported and the glow of fires could be seen from the Danish west coast on return.  A moderate A.A. barrage was met and two aircraft had combats with enemy fighters.

24.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests were carried out.

24/25.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty one aircraft took off as detailed to attack Stuttgart.  Eighteen aircraft bombed the target with the aid of markers, but the raid appeared to be scattered.  One aircraft returned early with engine trouble.  Intense A.A. fire was encountered over the target, and fighters were fairly active, two aircraft having combats.  Two aircraft failed to return, these were captained by NZ415216 P/O. J. McRae & NZ428800 P/O. K. Whitehouse.

25.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests and night flying tests were carried out.

25/26.7.44
Operational Flying
.  Fourteen aircraft took off to attack Stuttgart, only ten however, were successful, and they reported a concentrated raid to be developing, with many fires and explosions.  Heavy A.A. fire was only slight in the target area, but enemy fighters were again active.  Two aircraft had combats and one, captained by NZ425948 F/S. Smith, M. claimed a FW190 destroyed.  On return two aircraft landed at Ford, one due to engine trouble and the other owing to damage to the petrol tank and rear turret by heavy A.A. fire.  Of the four abortive sorties, one aircraft jettisoned after its starboard inner engine had caught fire when in combat, another failed to see any markers when over the target, and brought its bombs back, and the other two returned early owing to severe icing.

26.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Cross country exercises, fighter affiliation and air tests were carried out.

27.7.44
Operational Flying
.  Twenty one aircraft were detailed to attack the constructional works at Coquereaux during daylight, but this operation was postponed until the night 27/28 July, and was finally cancelled.
Administration.  NZ425238 P/O. M. Dare, NZ425914 F/S. Layton, R., NZ422424 F/O. J. Morris & 159574 P/O. T. Waugh, and crews arrived on posting from 31 Base.

28.7.44
Non-Operational Flying
.  Air tests were carried out.
Administration.  176437 P/O. J. Johnson & NZ414715 F/O. F. Wood and crews arrived on posting from 31 Base.

28/29.7.44
Operational Flying.
  Twenty two aircraft set out as detailed to attack Stuttgart.  Twenty aircraft successfully bombed the target with the aid of markers, but it is thought that several aircraft undershot, as they appeared to be two concentration of fires 2-3 miles apart.  Fighters were very active in the target area and also en route, several aircraft having combats.  The aircraft captained by NZ413043 A/S/L. L. Drummond, was attacked five times by a JU88, all of which were indecisive, followed by an attack by an unidentified enemy aircraft which is claimed as destroyed, being seen to go down in flames.  At the same time as this our aircraft was also being attacked by two JU88s, one of which was damaged by fire from our aircraft.  Two aircraft failed to return, they were captained by NZ421403 A/F/L. N. Stokes & NZ421469 F/O. I. Blance.

29.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests were carried out.

30.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests, night fighter affiliation and cross country flights were carried out.
Operational Flying.  Seventeen aircraft were detailed to take part in an early morning attack on enemy troops and armoured concentrations near Amaye-Sur-Seulles.  All crews successfully attacked from a low level and reports indicate that the bombing was well concentrated and ably controlled with a gradual advance southwards as ordered.  No results other than clouds of smoke were seen.  One aircraft (Captain NZ42117 F/S. Nairne, C.) failed to return.

31.7.44
Non-Operational Flying.
  Air tests and cross country flights were carried out.
Operational Flying.  The squadron was standing by for operations, but were not required.

Daily Weather Details.

1 July, 1944.  Cloudy with rain at first, becoming intermittent towards dusk, ceasing before midnight.
2 July, 1944.  Cloudy with occasional intermittent rain.  Visibility generally 4-10 miles.
3 July, 1944.  Cloudy, becoming fair.  Visibility 4-6 miles.
4 July, 1944.  Cloudy, becoming fair.  Visibility 3000 yds, improving to 6-8 miles.
5 July, 1944.  Fair to fine.  Visibility 6-12 miles.
6 July, 1944.  Fair. Visibility 10-20 miles.
7 July, 1944.  Cloudy with intermittent rain.  Visibility 4-6 miles improving to 6-12 miles.
8 July, 1944.  Cloudy with fair periods.  Visibility over 10 miles.
9 July, 1944.  Cloudy with occasional light rain at midday.  Visibility 8-15 miles.
10 July, 1944.  Cloudy with an occasional shower.  Visibility 10-25 miles.
11 July, 1944.  Cloudy. Visibility over 10 miles.
12 July, 1944.  Cloudy. Visibility over 8 miles.
13 July, 1944.  Cloudy with occasional slight rain at first, and thunderstorm towards dusk. Visibility poor.
14 July, 1944.  Cloudy.  Visibility 4-12 miles.
15 July, 1944.  Cloudy.  Visibility over 6 miles.
16 July, 1944.  Fair to fine.  Visibility 5-10 miles, improving to 25-30 miles.
17 July, 1944.  Cloudy with fog at dawn, clearing quickly.  Visibility 6-10 miles generally.
18 July, 1944.  Cloudy most of day.  Visibility 6-15 miles generally.
19 July, 1944.  Cloudy becoming fine.  Visibility mainly 8-15 miles.
20 July, 1944.  Cloudy.  Visibility over 10 miles.
21 July, 1944.  Cloudy with occasional intermittent drizzle.  Visibility 10-20 miles, falling to 6 miles in precipitation.
22 July, 1944.  Cloudy with slight intermittent drizzle.  Visibility 10-15 miles.
23 July, 1944.  Cloudy.  Visibility over 10 miles.
24 July, 1944.  Cloudy.  Visibility 1-2 miles at first, improving to 4-6 miles.
25 July, 1944.  Cloudy with slight rain at dusk.  Visibility 4-10 miles.
26 July, 1944.  Cloudy.  Visibility over 15 miles.
27 July, 1944.  Cloudy with intermittent rain.  Visibility poor.
28 July, 1944.  Cloudy with occasional thundery showers.  Visibility over 10 miles.
29 July, 1944.  Cloudy with continuous rain in morning and showers in evening.  Visibility generally 10 miles.
30 July, 1944.  Fair, generally.  Visibility poor at first, improving to over 15 miles.
31 July, 1944.  Cloudy with occasional light drizzle.  Visibility 2-5 miles generally.

SUMMARY OF EVENTS.

Operational Flying.  Attacks have been mainly against targets in Northern France in support of the Allied invading Armies.  Other targets have been Stuttgart, which was attacked three times, Kiel and Homberg.  Mines have also been laid in the Kattegat area.

From these operations thirteen aircraft have failed to return, seven of these being from the attack against Homberg.

Non-Operational Flying.  Our usual programme has been restricted owing to heavy operational commitments, although whenever possible all types of training has been carried out.

Awards.  The Distinguished Flying Cross was awarded to NZ415212 A/F/L. E. Witting, 159096 F/O. A. Proctor, and 170391 P/O. J. Handbury.

Monthly totals of flying hours:-  Operational:  1,667.55
Non-Operational:                                                  101.15

Operational Sorties:-  Cumulative total from 1.1.44  :  1,578
Monthly total:                                                                      405
Cumulative total of bombs and mines dropped:-         16,212 tons.
Monthly total of bombs dropped:                                   1,596.1 tons.
Monthly total of mines dropped:                                      23.8 tons.

APPENDIX.

Copies of Personnel Occurrence Reports issued during July, 1944.                    No. 7.

 [Signed R. J. A. Leslie]

Wing Commander, Commanding,

NO. 75(NZ) SQUADRON, R.A.F.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s