Tag Archives: Hamburg

James Allen Ward photograph from Gwyn Martin post – some more names

VC for Jimmy Ward

VC for Jimmy Ward
© David Martin

A follow up to my recent post presenting material relating to Gwyn Martin and his crews. Within Gwyn’s second crew Op history are 2 images of Jimmy Ward, relating to the award of his VC. Gwyn and  crew mate Ray Curlewis returned from leave to discover the news of Jimmy’s award of the Victoria Cross:

“We returned to a Feltwell agog with excitement and celebration. Jimmy Ward had received an immediate award of the V.C. for climbing out on to the wing of his aircraft to put out a fire in the starboard engine. The aircraft was under attack by a Ju. 88 night fighter at the time, and he was unable to wear his parachute. They were at 13,000 feet over the Zuider Zee. The rear gunner, Alan (Shorty) Box, won a D.F.M. and the pilot, Ben Widdowson, a D.F.C. Joe Lawton, the navigator, was overlooked in the handout of awards, in spite of his having made a significant contribution to the success of Jimmy’s brave wing walk.”

At the time of receiving the above photograph, I knew I had not seen it before and this feeling was at least also confirmed by Chris when he saw the post.

Thanks to Chris we also now have a few more names for the individuals in the photograph. Based on my original caption (which is now updated in the Saunders Op’s page), here is a new caption with input from Chris:

“A second picture commemorating Jimmy Ward’s VC.
From L to R where identified: (3) Gwyn Martin, (4) Ray Curlewis, (5) Jimmy Ward, (6) Joe Lawton, (7) Charlie Black, (8) W/C Cyril Kay, (9) Allan Box possibly, (10) G/C John ‘Speedy’ Powell possibly, (12) John Breckell.”

Another addition to the Ward story arrived from Gwyn’s son, David this morning – a menu of the celebratory meal described in an extract from “New Zealanders in the Air War” by Allan W. Mitchell which was posted 3 years ago, which can be read here.

As David notes – ” everything that any self-respecting Airman could possibly want!”

VC Award Menu

VC Award Menu
© David Martin

 

Sgt. James Allen Ward, V.C. – new pictures of Wellington Mk.Ic L.7818 AA-R

Close-up of the damage caused to Vickers Wellington Mark IC, L7818 'AA-V', of No. 75 (New Zealand) Squadron RAF, at Feltwell, Norfolk, after returning from an attack on Munster, Germany, on the night of 7/8 July 1941. While over the Zuider Zee, cannon shells from an attacking Messerschmitt Me 110 struck the starboard wing (A), causing a fire from a fractured fuel line which threatened to to spread to the whole wing. Efforts by the crew to douse the flames failed, and Sergeant James Allen Ward, the second pilot, volunteered to tackle the fire by climbing out onto the wing via the astro-hatch (B). With a dinghy-rope tied around his waist, he made hand and foot-holds in the fuselage and wings (1, 2 and 3) and moved out across the wing from where he was eventually able to extinguish the burning wing-fabric. His courageous actions earned him the Victoria Cross. He was shot down and killed while bombing Hamburg on the night of 15/16 September 1941, in another Wellington of the Squadron. CH 3223 Part of AIR MINISTRY SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION Royal Air Force official photographer

Close-up of the damage caused to Vickers Wellington Mark IC, L7818 ‘AA-V’, of No. 75 (New Zealand) Squadron RAF, at Feltwell, Norfolk, after returning from an attack on Munster, Germany, on the night of 7/8 July 1941. While over the Zuider Zee, cannon shells from an attacking Messerschmitt Me 110 struck the starboard wing (A), causing a fire from a fractured fuel line which threatened to to spread to the whole wing. Efforts by the crew to douse the flames failed, and Sergeant James Allen Ward, the second pilot, volunteered to tackle the fire by climbing out onto the wing via the astro-hatch (B). With a dinghy-rope tied around his waist, he made hand and foot-holds in the fuselage and wings (1, 2 and 3) and moved out across the wing from where he was eventually able to extinguish the burning wing-fabric. His courageous actions earned him the Victoria Cross. He was shot down and killed while bombing Hamburg on the night of 15/16 September 1941, in another Wellington of the Squadron.
CH 3223
Part of AIR MINISTRY SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION
Royal Air Force official photographer

The picture above is a well known image of Wellington Mk.Ic L.7818 AA-R (not AA-V as the attached caption states), the Wellington that Sgt. James Allen Ward VC, famously crawled out of to extinguish a fire on the wing.

I am very excited to present a number of additional images of this aircraft that were taken on its return. The images were passed to me by an interested party. Whilst there is nothing written on the back of these images, the inclusion of a duplicative images of the photo above with the set, and the additional images showing the same or extra damage to the Wellington suggest very strongly that these are images of L.7818 after its return from Munster on the 7th of July 1941.

P1070756crctd

©Kerry Foster/ 75nzsquadron.com

The first images is as I said, is an almost exact replica of the first photograph from the Imperial War Museum. Interestingly, the various points of damage are annotated by hand and do not numerically relate to the order of damage on the IWM image.

P1070754crctd

© Kerry Foster/ 75nzsquadron.com

The second and first of the ‘new’ images shows the Wellington from a front 3/4 low view, showing the significant damage to the starboard side of the nose of the aircraft – the missing canvas showing the aircraft’s famous geodesic frame construction. I am in no doubt that this is a second image of the same aircraft in the first photograph – specific details on the front of the aircraft, upon closer examination clearly are the same when viewed from this new angle. For the first time, it is also possible to see the far more visible damage to the underside of the starboard wing.  Also, just below the circled damage of the underside of the wing, is a smaller circled detail annotated ‘note bullet hole’.

P1070755crctd

© Kerry Foster/ 75nzsquadron.com

The final photograph shows a much closer view of the underside of the Wellington’s starboard wing. There appears to be blackening or scorching to the bottom left of the photograph, on the edge of the hole burnt through the canvas of the wing, revealing again, the unique geodesic frame.

If anybody has seen these photographs before, or perhaps knows or others – I am sure we would all be fascinated to learn more of the aftermath of this famous event.

Read more about the events of that night here.
Watch a short interview with Sgt James Allen Ward V.C. here.

Film clip of Jimmy Ward V.C. – the right man, in the right spot, at the right time…….

James Ward VC © IWM (CH 3200)

Many thanks to Dave for posting a wonderful, albeit short movie clip of Jimmy Ward V.C. talking about his award, on the 75 Squadron, RAF/ RNZAF Association Facebook page. I had no idea that such a clip existed, but I think what is truly touching is that the modesty and perhaps slight awkwardness that has often been written about James and the spotlight he fell under is shown in this short clip, after his heroic actions on the night of the 7th July 1941 after a raid on Münster.

I reproduce text from ‘New Zealanders in the Air War’, by Alan W. Mitchell, that I posted originally about James Ward’s exploits…….

The din died. The sergeant pilot threw off his nervousness, and, in a boyish voice, edged with precision, he said:
We’ve got here to-night a number of chaps hiding themselves in a corner who’ve done more than we’ve ever done. They’re the ground-crews who look after our kites. They don’t get anything like this. There are no V.C.’s for them, but if they didn’t do a first-class job for us, as they all do, we wouldn’t get back. Those chaps—they keep our kites in first-class order.”

Then, as the cheering welled out again, he slipped away to a window. He sat on the ledge, his head bowed, half smiling nervously as the cheers gave way to the singing of “ For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow.”

A jolly good fellow. It was an understatement. If any of those singing men had been asked at that moment what they thought of Sergeant Pilot James Allen Ward, New Zealand’s first V.C. of this war, they would have stared and said with intensity, “ He’s a bloody fine little chap. He’s got all the guts in the world.”

read the full chapter from ‘New Zealanders in the Air War’ here.

Information requested on Robert Toller – Ward crew. KIA 15th September 1941

I have been contacted by Carl, whose uncle was Robert Toller, the Wireless Operator of the crew Captained by James Allen ‘Jimmy’ Ward V.C. on the night of 15th September 1941, when 4 of the 6 crew were lost.

My natural reaction regarding a request such as this is to go straight to the ORB for that month. What I found was surprising, bemusing  and frustrating. After staring at the 2 pages of Form 541, relating to the Hamburg raid, I realised that there was no evidence of the Ward crews participation, let alone loss in this raid. The only veiled reference to a loss was;

“One plane was seen to be shot down and observations show that Searchlights and Night Fighters were co-operating very well.”

A check of Form 540 gave me;

Operations.              BOMBING ATTACKS AGAINST TARGETS AT HAMBURG.
Twelve Wellington aircraft of this Unit were detailed to carry out the above attacks. Two of these aircraft failed to return; one being captained by SGT. J.A. Ward who was awarded  the Victoria Cross on 4th August, 1941. There was clear weather over the target, and bursts were seen in many parts of target area. A.A. fire was heavy over and near target area. Searchlights were numerous, working in cones, and co-operating with A.A. fire and night fighters.

Based on the previous Op the crew flew and a check with the Roll of Honour, the Ward crew that night were;

Sgt James Allen ‘Jimmy’ Ward, VC, RNZAF NZ401793 – Pilot.
Died age 22. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery Germany.

Sgt Horace Gordon Sloman, RAFVR 929627 – 2Pilot.
Died age 21. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery Germany.

Sgt L. E. Peterson RAFVR – Observer.
Shot down. PoW no. 9630. PoW Camps – Dulag Luft, Stalags VIIIB, Luft VI, 357. Safe UK NK.

Sgt Robert William Toller, RAFVR 1054292 – Wireless Operator.
Died age 20. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery Germany.

Sgt H. C. Watson, RAFVR 952162 – Front Gunner.
Shot down. PoW no. not known. PoW Camps not known. Safe UK not known.

Sergeant Kenneth Hutley Toothill, RAFVR 1114337 – Rear Gunner.
Died age 29. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery Germany.

A check through ‘Forever Strong – The Story of 75 Squadron RNZAF 1916-1990‘ by Norman Franks, suggested that 2 crews were lost that night, however it seemed only worth mentioning the loss of Jimmy Ward – the other crew lost on that raid was not even mentioned…..

This makes me quite angry to be honest – and I apologise to Carl, given that this is a request about his uncle, so I dig some more through the Roll of Honour, which to be honest requires some subtle search terms to bring out what I am looking for.

The second crew that were lost on the night of 15/16th September 1941 were;
Sgt Anthony Henry Ryder Hawkins, RNZAF NZ40971 – Pilot.
Died age 20. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery, Germany.

Sgt Robert Boswell Blakeway, RNZAF NZ403486 – 2nd Pilot.
Shot down. PoW no. 39332. PoW camps – Dulag Luft, Stalags 9C, Luft VI, Luft IV and Luft I. Took part in the forced march from Stalag Luft IV (Gross Tychow) to Stalag XIB (Fallingbostel) 6 Feb to 1 May 1945. Promoted to W/O while a PoW. Safe UK 1 May 1945.

P/O Hugh MacLachlan Aitchison, RCAF R.54169/ J.4782 – Observer.
Died age 28. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery, Germany.

Sgt John Gifford Foulkes, RAFVR  909428 – Wireless Operator.
Died age 20. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery, Germany.

Sgt Derek Richard Fawcett
, RAFVR 1755949 – Front Gunner.
Died age 21. Buried Hamburg War Cemetery, Germany.

Sgt W. E. Mullins, RCAF R.54981 – Rear Gunner.
Shot down. PoW no. 18334, PoW Camps – Dulag Luft, Stalags VIIIB, Luft VI and 357.

So, primarily if you have information you wish to share with Carl regarding his uncle, but in fact any information on any of the airmen who were lost that night would be gratefully received.

As always, many thanks in advance……….

Jimmy Ward, V.C. – ‘a bloody fine little chap’.

James Ward VC © IWM (CH 3200)

James Ward VC
© IWM (CH 3200)

What follows is the opening portion of a chapter in “New Zealanders in the Air War”, by Alan W. Mitchell, entitled ‘Sergeant Pilot James Allen Ward’. The full chapter can be read here, I have reproduced  the chapter on it’s own page, simply because its too long to easily present within a single post.

“Tobacco smoke fogged the Sergeants’ Mess. Officers and sergeants of 75 (New Zealand) Bomber Squadron standing on chairs or ringed round tables, shouted above the din of voices and the dance-music of the squadron’s band.

The High Commissioner for New Zealand, Mr W. J. Jordan, sat back on a sofa. He smoked a cigar, and his strong, homely face smiled his pleasure. Near him was Group Captain M. W. Buckley, who was shortly to give up his command of the station to return to New Zealand.

Amused, he looked at the back of the long room where officers and sergeants were climbing on table-tops, arms round one another’s necks. As he watched they began to chant. Soon the whole mess joined in. The band became inaudible.
We-want-Jimmy-Ward. We-want-Jimmy-Ward. We-want-Jimmy – Ward.”

Ofiicers and sergeants, pilots, air-gunners, observers, wireless operators—all took up the chorus, bawling from the table-tops, swaying, laughing, holding one another up. Suddenly the chant burst’ into cheering.

A short, slight boy stood by a microphone in front of the band. His head was bowed, his face pale, contrasting with his mat of dark hair. His sensitive mouth was twisted in an embarrassed smile as he looked at his feet and shuffled them. His thumbs were stuck in his trouser-pockets. Outside the pockets his fingers worked uneasily against his uniform. He wore a sergeant’s stripes, and tabs on his shoulders bore the words “New Zealand.” Under his wings he wore a scrap of maroon ribbon bearing a miniature bronze medal.

The din died. The sergeant pilot threw off his nervousness, and, in a boyish voice, edged with precision, he said:
“ We’ve got here to-night a number of chaps hiding themselves in a corner who’ve done more than we’ve ever done. They’re the ground-crews who look after our kites. They don’t get anything like this. There are no V.C.’s for them, but if they didn’t do a first-class job for us, as they all do, we wouldn’t get back. Those chaps—they keep our kites in first-class order.”

Then, as the cheering welled out again, he slipped away to a window. He sat on the ledge, his head bowed, half smiling nervously as the cheers gave way to the singing of “ For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow.”

A jolly good fellow. It was an understatement. If any of those singing men had been asked at that moment what they thought of Sergeant Pilot James Allen Ward, New Zealand’s first V.C. of this war, they would have stared and said with intensity, “ He’s a bloody fine little chap. He’s got all the guts in the world.”

read the rest of the chapter here

Blincoe crew

Blincoe crew

L to R back row, Desmond Hayward, Kenneth Blincoe, Frank Boese, Harold Lowe, front row, Edward McDermott, Desmond Clearwater and George Cook

A while ago, I received this amazing colour picture from Kevin King. So far its the only colour image that I have seen related to 75(NZ) Squadron. The image and details of the crew and their crash comes from a Dutch site and the page can be seen here.

Having had a look at the ORB and the details of the raid, I am  inclined to believe that the information on this page is slightly wrong. On the night of the 3rd of February, the crew took Sgt. Andrew James Newell Scott with them to Hamburg, as second Pilot. To this end, I think that this picture is of the ‘Blincoe crew’ and is very unlikely to contain Sgt. Scott.

I appreciate my contention regarding the individuals in the picture is a little controversial, I look forward to being proved wrong, but my gut feeling says that I am not.

It was not a good night for the Squadron. As well as the Blincoe crew, P/O John McCullough and his crew, including Raymond Willaim Henderson as 2nd Pilot were also lost. The 2 captains were amongst the most experienced in the Squadron. and the loss of 2 2nd Pilots meant the following morning 2 ‘headless’ crews remained.

The crew on that night were;
Plt Off Kenneth Howard Blincoe, DFC, RNZAF NZ412194 Pilot. Age 33.
Citation DFC (24 Apr 1945 to date from 3 Feb 1943):
This officer is a most enthusiastic captain of aircraft and has completed many operational sorties, mostly against well defended targets. He has always been most determined in all his attacks and has set an example of the highest order to his crew“.

P/O Andrew James Newell Scott RNZAF NZ414685 2nd Pilot.

Sgt Frank Arthur Boese RAFVR 1293282 Observer. Age 22.

Sgt Desmond David Hayward RAFVR 651764 Flight Engineer. Age 20.

F/O Harold Lowe, DFC, RAFVR 905609/ 115129 Wireless Operator. Age 23.
Citation DFC (24 April 1945 to date from 2 Feb 1943):
This officer has participated in many operational sorties, the majority of which have been against strongly defended German targets. He has always shown great courage and determination in the face of the enemy and his work in the Squadron has been of the highest order and an example to all. Died Wednesday 3rd February 1943, age 23, during a raid on Hamburg“.

Sgt. George Wood Cook RNZAF NZ412514 Air Bomber. Age 24.

F/Sgt. Edward McDermott RCAF R.96960 Mid Upper Gunner. Age 19.

Sgt. Desmond Clearwater RNZAF NZ412314 Rear Gunner. Age 23.

The entire crew were buried in Amersfoort (Oud Leusden) General Cemetery, Netherlands.